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Presenter(s): Jerrold Jackson, MA, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: Busy SLPs need solutions that support quality care within the time and resources available to them every day. Collaboration with speech-language pathology assistants (SLPAs) can maintain the integrity of services and continuity of care for patients, clients, and students and allow the SLP to practice at “the top of their license/certification.” However, for many SLPs, the thought of supervising an assistant comes with questions and concerns. This on demand webinar provides a framework for supervision and a discussion on how to ensure it’s a collaborative relationship for all stakeholders.
Presenter(s): Lauren Calandruccio, PhD, CCC-A
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: The likelihood of encountering multilingual individuals, non-English-speaking individuals, and non-native speakers of English in the clinic is becoming more common. As audiologists are working with linguistically diverse populations, they may find themselves asking, “How should I evaluate speech perception in my patients who are not monolingual speakers of English? Which speech materials should I use?” This on demand webinar reviews the current literature on multilingual and non-native speech perception and discusses approaches to best serve patients from diverse linguistic backgrounds.
Presenter(s): Wendy Jennejahn, MS, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: SLPs who work with children with feeding disorders often face challenges when managing oral hypersensitivities or advancing a child’s diet due to refusal behaviors. This on demand webinar explores the question, “What can I do when oral-sensory-motor deficits and difficult behaviors intersect?” The speaker discusses factors to consider when evaluating children with behavioral feeding disorders as well as uses video examples to illustrate and discuss various treatment strategies.
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: These SIG 2 articles focus on clinical assessment and practices for individuals with aphasia. Topics covered included challenges associated with diagnosing primary progressive aphasia (PPA) and the impact of adaptive yoga programs for persons with aphasia. First, Aimee Dietz, E. Susan Duncan, Lauren Bislick, Sarah Stegman, Jenna Collins, Chitrali Mamlekar, Rachel Gleason, and Michael J. McCarthy provide an overview of the potential impact adapted yoga programs can have for people with stroke-induced aphasia. Second, Adithya Chandregowda raises awareness about the challenges associated with encountering primary progressive aphasia (PPA) patients in the acute hospital setting.
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.15
Summary: This Perspectives activity highlights two articles with objective measures for both evaluation and treatment of velopharyngeal dysfunction. The first article discusses the palatal closure efficiency (PaCE) index. This is an aerodynamic tool used to estimate the velopharyngeal opening during certain speech contexts. This is done by measuring a percentage of change between nasal and oral cognates of an individual. The second article describes the nasometer in depth, highlighting its use as an evaluation and treatment tool for decreasing hypernasality. It goes into further detail on the differences between hypernasality and measured nasalance, highlighting both strengths and limitations of the nasalance score.
Presenter(s): Celisa Steele, MA; Jeff Cobb, MA
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: In this course, two experts in adult learning present proven strategies to help presenters deliver more impactful learning experiences—ones that effectively support a learner’s ability to gain and apply new knowledge or skills. Designed to be used during presentation development, the course explores key takeaways from the science of adult learning (andragogy), highlighting methods that support learning and those that hinder it. The speakers offer practical tips and strategies that can be integrated into presentations of any kind.
Credit(s): PDHs: 6.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.6
Summary: This collection of articles presents clinicians with evidence on a variety of topics in dysphagia that can be utilized in practice immediately. Alaina Martens and Emily Zimmerman offer insight regarding changes to feeding patterns in infants diagnosed with bronchopulmonary dysplasia after prolonged oxygen therapy in the newborn intensive care unit. Paula Leslie and colleagues provide a framework of health and illness and how food and drink are much more. They stress the importance of clinician appreciation as a cultural guest in our patients’ lives. Bonnie Martin-Harris and colleagues stress the importance of instrumentation with a thorough review of available practice guidelines and appropriateness criteria issued to date, revealing a deficit of up-to-date, comprehensive, evidence-based information on the diagnosis and evaluation of oropharyngeal dysphagia. Specifically, a lack of quality guidance on the ordering, performance, and reporting of the modified barium swallow study has hindered efforts to improve standardization and ensure quality continuity of care. Naomi Gurevich and colleagues stress the need to clarify guidelines and increase interprofessional education between both professions to improve patient care. George Barnes and Nancy Toms highlight speech-language pathologists’ need for a solid foundation of knowledge when it comes to patients with highly complex disease processes and care plans. Deirdre Muldoon and colleagues conduct a review of published literature regarding management of feeding difficulties at the oral phase of feeding in children with autism spectrum disorder and/or developmental disability. Finally, Paul M. Evitts and colleagues reveal a potential way to track aspiration in healthy adults using an app.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: This course is composed of three articles that center around quality of life: at end of life, following a stroke, and among individuals with voice disorders.
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.15
Summary: This course examines three progressive cultural topics as they relate to speech-language pathology and audiology: ageism among CSD graduate students; institutional, symbolic, and individual systems of oppression; and the interaction between social determinants and health disparities.
Presenter(s): Tommie L. Robinson, Jr., PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: SLPs practicing in health care provide services within a largely for-profit system in the U.S. Consequently, the business needs of health care, challenges related to reimbursement and advocacy, and disparities in health care access have resulted in a need to adapt clinical practice to future trends while rethinking career growth and advancement in the field. This session contextualizes the challenges in the practice of medical speech-language pathology and provides practical ideas to facilitate change in your realms of influence at your job and beyond.
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