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Visit the ASHA coronavirus resource pages to stay on top of all the latest resources and supports specific to issues related to COVID-19.

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Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: The articles in this journal self-study explore research related to various aspects of hearing health and care during the COVID-19 pandemic. Specific topics include: supporting individuals with tinnitus, teaching students about noise-induced hearing loss, and understanding pandemic-related disruptions to hearing abilities and care. Audiologists will take away information they can apply as the pandemic and audiology practice continue to evolve.
Credit(s): PDHs: 6.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.6
Summary: Concussion - or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) - is a unique injury that is different from more severe brain injury, and addressing the associated cognitive deficits requires personalized, targeted interventions These articles discuss research and practical implications for the management of cognitive symptoms of mTBI, including defining the role of the SLP on interdisciplinary management teams, exploring specific assessment and treatment strategies, and emphasizing functional, personalized goals. The articles are from a 2021 American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology forum "Interdisciplinary Management of Concussion or Mild TBI." The articles provide evidence and strategies to increase clinician confidence and effectiveness when working with individuals with concussion or mTBI.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: This activity is a grouping of studies related to the understanding stuttering throughout the life span. The activity is based on articles related to attentional focus on motor control in people who stutter (PWS) and the relationship to social stress, acoustic measures of emotion in children who stutter, a study of covert stuttering throughout the lifespan, vocational stereotyping of PWS by human resource preprofessionals, and audio-based podcasts to assist in self-help for PWS. Together, these articles investigate important measures in understanding stuttering and how researchers and clinicians can better understand the condition of stuttering.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: Even before the COVID-19 pandemic required clinicians to rapidly adapt their practice for remote service provision, researchers were already exploring effective telehealth approaches for audiology. The articles in this journal self-study (selected from a special issue of the American Journal of Audiology, “4th International Meeting on Internet and Audiology”) examine teleaudiology tools and methodologies for hearing screenings, home-based auditory assessment for people who use cochlear implants, assessing hearing aid outcomes using ecological momentary assessment (EMA), and a tool for evaluating hearing aid performance.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: This activity presents a variety of topics related to telepractice service provision. The first article offers a case study on the effects of a hybrid telepractice/onsite treatment program for a child who stutters. The following article discusses common technical issues encountered during telepractice and a process for managing them with English- and Spanish-speaking clients. The final article details the findings of a study on integrating technology through telepractice to support clients with dementia.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: This activity presents a diverse perspective, including four different speech science articles focused on a variety of topics. Kimball and Sayce discuss the pros and cons of research using behavior and functional assessment and treatment in the areas of speech science and voice, specifically their limitation in outlining etiology or explaining treatment resistance. They also provide an overview of genetic research approaches as a possible path forward to develop additional evidence-based treatment approaches. Neel reviews the production and perception of extralinguistic information regarding sex/gender, sexual orientation, age, non-native accent, regional and social dialect, and race and ethnicity. The article explores the literature in the above areas reviewing acoustical features and common misperceptions, concluding with instructional activities to enhance student awareness of indexical characteristics. McAllister et al. studied the effects of biofeedback for residual rhotic errors in a preliminary case series. Participants were five native English speakers who had not yet generalized rhotic production. Treatment consisted of either electropalatographic or visual-acoustic biofeedback using the Challenge Point Program software. Although participant responses to treatment were variable, the median effect size tended to exceed the minimum value considered clinically significant. Gritsyk et al. examined three measures to determine which best predicted change in production accuracy during a vowel learning task. Using 20 female college students, researchers administered three tasks: an oral stereognosis task, a bite block task using auditory making, and a new phonetic awareness task. The bite block task with auditory masking, measuring proprioceptive awareness, was the only task significantly related to performance in speech learning.
Credit(s): PDHs: 6.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.65
Summary: This journal self-study course explores best practices for dysphasia assessment and recent innovations in dysphagia treatment. The articles – from an American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology special issue “Select Papers From the 2018 Charleston Swallowing Conference at Northwestern University” – will help SLPs develop a deeper understanding of how to select appropriate treatment techniques, as well as why those techniques can be impactful in improving swallowing function. The articles delve deeply into past, current, and future treatment approaches for dysphagia and will be helpful for established clinicians as well as those who are new to the field of dysphagia assessment and treatment.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: This journal self-study focuses on rationale and techniques for enhancing clinicians’ cultural competence when working in Native American and tribal communities. The articles, originally published in a 2016 issue of Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups (SIG 14, Cultural and Linguistic Diversity), address the lasting impact of historical trauma on health and education; the importance of differentiated instruction; the perspective of a student with hearing loss who experiences traditional cultural education; and speech-language intervention programs and services in Native communities.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.25
Summary: Clinical practice for SLPs in health care settings has changed dramatically – and continues to evolve – due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This journal self-study highlights evidence-based best practices and considerations for clinicians providing care to patients with voice and upper airway disorders, tracheostomy, and head and neck cancer during the COVID-19 pandemic to maximize patient and clinician safety while ensuring efficacious care.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: This journal self-study course highlights the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on people with aphasia, patients with cognitive communication impairments, and patient-provider communication. The findings can inform decision-making and assist SLPs in optimizing treatment for communication challenges for patients with COVID-19 as well as those for whom treatment has been altered as a result of the pandemic.
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