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Presenter(s): Carrie Nieman,MD, MPH
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This webinar will review the current state of hearing loss and hearing health care among individuals living with dementia, with an emphasis on addressing existing care disparities. The speaker will discuss the association between hearing loss and cognition, its impact on individuals living with dementia, and opportunities to expand access to hearing care through community-delivered approaches. This webinar – part of the SIGnature Series – was developed by SIG 7: Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation, SIG 8: Audiology and Public Health, and SIG 15: Gerontology.
Presenter(s): Samuel L. Bradley, Jr.,DSW; Nicholas Stanley,AuD, PhD, CCC-A
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: In this on demand webinar, Nicholas Stanley, an audiologist, and Samuel Bradley, a social worker, will discuss how the concepts of cultural mindfulness, humility, and rigor can help clinicians evaluate their own explicit and implicit racial biases and identify practices that establish a more effective and inclusive clinical environment. The webinar will explore strategies that lead to more equitable patient access and outcomes. Additionally, the presenters will model and promote healthy conversations surrounding race and its influence on everyday interactions. This webinar – part of the SIGnature Series – was developed by SIG 6: Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics.
Presenter(s): Amy Morgan Linde, MA, CCC-SLP; Graham Schenck, PhD, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This on demand webinar will explore service delivery modifications as well as evaluation and treatment principles for velopharyngeal dysfunction in the era of the COVID-19 pandemic. Speakers will address service delivery considerations during the pandemic for individuals with cleft palate and associated craniofacial or velopharyngeal conditions who may experience resonance, speech sound production, voice, feeding and swallowing, dental and orthodontic, hearing, and psychosocial difficulties. This webinar – part of the SIGnature Series – was developed by SIG 5: Craniofacial and Velopharyngeal Disorders.
Presenter(s): Bruce Poburka, PhD, CCC-SLP; Cara Sauder, PhD, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This on demand webinar will explore the use of videostroboscopy and videoendoscopy to inform assessment and management of voice disorders (e.g., identification of physical factors, vocal technique factors, hygiene issues, stimulability testing, etc.). The speakers will describe stroboscopic technique, including scientific underpinnings and limitations, as well as discuss rating forms/scales, assessment protocols, and practice ratings to support clinicians’ decision-making regarding videostroboscopy. The webinar will also include a practice activity. This webinar – part of the SIGnatureSeries – was developed by SIG 3: Voice and Upper Airway Disorders.
Presenter(s): D. Seles Gadson, PhD,CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This on demand webinar will highlight the vital role SLPs play in improving outcomes for African Americans with aphasia who are recovering from stroke. The webinar will explore how using the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (WHO ICF) framework and the concept of health-related quality of life (HRQL) to determine intervention targets can improve outcomes. The speaker will also discuss how SLPs can address health disparities, including in health literacy, that affect African American stroke survivors with and without aphasia. This webinar – part of the SIGnature Series – was developed by SIG 2: Neurogenic Communication Disorders.
Presenter(s): Jennifer Black, MA, CCC-SLP, IMH-E
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: Developmental trauma has deleterious effects on social skills, cognitive abilities, and learning due to changes in the brain in response to these experiences. This on demand webinar will discuss relevant research and speech-language treatment approaches for children and adolescents who have experienced developmental trauma. This webinar – part of the SIGnature Series – was developed by SIG 1: Language Learning and Education.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.25
Summary: This collection of articles presents clinicians with information on some of the most timesensitive topics in dysphagia care of utmost relevance, particularly in the current COVID- 19 pandemic. Firstly, Liza Blumenfeld, Lisa Evangelista, Maggie Kuhn, Kristen Linnemeyer, Nogah Nativ-Zeltzer, and Heather Starmer provide best practice recommendations on the management of patients with head and neck cancers from the speech-language pathology perspective amid COVID-19. Authors Hema Desia and Jennifer Raminick then provide recommendations for safer feeding of infants on high flow oxygen therapy due to acute respiratory failure. Lastly, authors Grainne Brady and Justin Roe, Kellyn Hall and Leslie Johnson, and Annette Askren and Marnie Kershner discuss different aspects of clinician–patient collaborated dysphagia care delivery models and their impact on successful outcomes.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: First, Julie Case and Maria Grigos provide a review of speech motor control literature in childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) and give clinical implications to the assessment and treatment of CAS. Second, Kristen Allison reviews approaches to measuring speech intelligibility in children with motor speech disorders. Third, Tricia McCabe, Donna Thomas, and Elizabeth Murray describe Rapid Syllable Transition Treatment (ReST) as a treatment for CAS. Fourth, Nancy Tarshis, Michelle Winner, and Pamela Crooke explore how communication challenges in CAS impact social competency and how speech motor challenges impact social development. Finally, Nina Benway and Jonathan Preston evaluate if features of CAS in the literature could be replicated in a sample of school-age children. Readers will describe how speech motor skills have been found to change with practice in CAS, list the linguistic factors that can influence intelligibility, describe the quality of the research that supports ReST, explain ways to consider social cognition in therapy for CAS, and rank the speech features that distinguish the narrow phonetic transcriptions of children with CAS and speech sound disorders.
Credit(s): PDHs: 9.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.9
Summary: This journal self-study course is composed of papers from a 2019 Research Forum, Advancing Statistical Methods in Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences. These selected articles provide advanced-level discussion about clinically relevant statistical methodologies to give speech-language pathologists a stronger foundation from which to analyze and understand the statistical research they come across to decide when and how to apply it in practice.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 10) articles explore several issues related to student success. Sylvan, Brock, Perkins, and Garret examine prerequisites required by graduate programs in speech-language pathology across the United States. Roitsch, Murphy, and Raymer investigate the relationship between executive functions and academic outcomes in speech-language pathology graduate students. Richardson, Roberts, and Victor explore ways to predict the clinical success of graduate students studying speechlanguage pathology. Look, Shoemaker, Hoepner, and Blake discover benefits of engaging undergraduate students in research.
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