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Results 1 - 10 of 49
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: This activity is a grouping of studies related to the understanding stuttering throughout the life span. The activity is based on articles related to attentional focus on motor control in people who stutter (PWS) and the relationship to social stress, acoustic measures of emotion in children who stutter, a study of covert stuttering throughout the lifespan, vocational stereotyping of PWS by human resource preprofessionals, and audio-based podcasts to assist in self-help for PWS. Together, these articles investigate important measures in understanding stuttering and how researchers and clinicians can better understand the condition of stuttering.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: This activity presents a variety of topics related to telepractice service provision. The first article offers a case study on the effects of a hybrid telepractice/onsite treatment program for a child who stutters. The following article discusses common technical issues encountered during telepractice and a process for managing them with English- and Spanish-speaking clients. The final article details the findings of a study on integrating technology through telepractice to support clients with dementia.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: This activity presents a diverse perspective, including four different speech science articles focused on a variety of topics. Kimball and Sayce discuss the pros and cons of research using behavior and functional assessment and treatment in the areas of speech science and voice, specifically their limitation in outlining etiology or explaining treatment resistance. They also provide an overview of genetic research approaches as a possible path forward to develop additional evidence-based treatment approaches. Neel reviews the production and perception of extralinguistic information regarding sex/gender, sexual orientation, age, non-native accent, regional and social dialect, and race and ethnicity. The article explores the literature in the above areas reviewing acoustical features and common misperceptions, concluding with instructional activities to enhance student awareness of indexical characteristics. McAllister et al. studied the effects of biofeedback for residual rhotic errors in a preliminary case series. Participants were five native English speakers who had not yet generalized rhotic production. Treatment consisted of either electropalatographic or visual-acoustic biofeedback using the Challenge Point Program software. Although participant responses to treatment were variable, the median effect size tended to exceed the minimum value considered clinically significant. Gritsyk et al. examined three measures to determine which best predicted change in production accuracy during a vowel learning task. Using 20 female college students, researchers administered three tasks: an oral stereognosis task, a bite block task using auditory making, and a new phonetic awareness task. The bite block task with auditory masking, measuring proprioceptive awareness, was the only task significantly related to performance in speech learning.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 5) articles focus on the functional problems caused by the structural anomalies of the craniofacial complex and pathways for intervention. Articles describes the impact of submucous cleft palate, dental/skeletal anomalies, and distraction osteogenesis on speech and resonance outcomes for individuals with craniofacial anomalies. Multidisciplinary roles and best practice recommendations are also provided.
Credit(s): PDHs: 6.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.6
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 12) articles provide information on an assortment of current issues in augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) service provision. Specific topics include discussions regarding preparation and training of speech-language pathologists and other stakeholders in the AAC field as well as information regarding culturally competent assessment and intervention. In addition, literacy acquisition using video visual scene displays is introduced and information regarding image color in AAC displays is provided.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: This collection of articles presents information currently relevant to caring for patients. Firstly, Cara Donohue and James L. Coyle, and Christina Kang and David Lott, share service delivery focusing on the diagnoses of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and muscle tension dysphagia, respectively. Samantha Shune and Ashwini Namasivayam provide systematic strategies to better support patients’ informal caregivers. Rinki Varindani Desai and Ashwini Namasivayam-MacDonald describe the practice patterns of speech-language pathologists managing dysphagia in persons with dementia. Lastly, Nancy Swigert and Ashley Wright describe effectiveness and efficiency as the key components of a value-based health-care system.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: These articles explore how the international world of speech-language pathology and audiology is expanding, and, with it, are opportunities to practice, share, and provide education around the world. The articles discuss sharing resources between speech-language pathologists and audiologists, regardless of practice setting.
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.15
Summary: These articles explore thickened liquids for oropharyngeal dysphagia, importance of patient selection, & balancing physical welfare/quality of life (QOL); QOL in patients/caregivers in recovery for swallowing disorders; audiologist knowledge of cognitive impairment/screening in outcomes/communication; and hearing screening for individuals who are diagnosed with dementia.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: This Perspectives issue focuses on clinical considerations for working with children and adults from culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) backgrounds. Topics presented include (a) effects of clear speech on perceptions of accentedness in American English, (b) ethnographic interviewing in clinical practice, (c) language errors in bilinguals under background noise and quiet conditions, and (d) assessment of speech sound disorders in school-aged children from CLD backgrounds.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: This Perspectives (SIG 19) includes four different speech science articles that focus on speech production, speech perception, or both. Akbari and Aoyama examine epenthetic vowels produced by Persian L2 speakers of English corroborating previous research findings regarding acoustical characteristics of anaptyctic epenthetic vowels—prothetic epenthetic vowels differ from the phonemic vowels they precede. Hitchcock et al. examine speech perception of typical adults, typical children, and children with speech sound disorders, finding that children with speech sound disorders differ as compared to both typical groups. Rong conducted a preliminary examination of the articulatory control of speech and speech-like tasks. The results revealed shared and task-specific articulatory features in speech and speech-like tasks, specifically sharing that alternating motion rate tasks may be more useful for assessing temporal aspects of articulation whereas sequential motion rate tasks may be more useful for assessing spatial aspects of articulation and coordination. Lastly, Boyd-Pratt and Donai review evidence that the high frequency region contains perceptual cues regarding segmental, speaker identity, and speaker sex as well as improved speech recognition in the presence of noise.
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