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Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: Pedagogical practices in communication sciences and disorders have grown thanks in part to innovative techniques from other fields. The articles in this activity each present models that can be successfully incorporated into our discipline. Slavych describes models of backward course design—course development that starts by focusing on learning outcomes before considering content or teaching methods. Squires and Squires introduce best–worst scaling, a method for examining group preferences, and reported on how it can inform admissions practices. Speights Atkins et al. describe models of mentoring undergraduate research experiences and their applications in two communication sciences and disorders research labs. Finally, Perryman et al. examine the effects of a mixed-reality simulation in which actors playing parents interacted through computer avatars with undergraduate students carrying out clinical procedures.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.25
Summary: This trio of SIG 13 articles provides information regarding unique factions of dysphagia intervention. Sophia Werden Abrams, Harmonie S. J. Chan, Jasmeet Sikand, Heather Wilkie, and Kim Smith raise awareness for the importance of neurodegenerative disorder research involving dysphagia caused by oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy. Michela Jean Mir and Karen Wheeler Hegland aim to shed light on the subjective use of cough assessment and the importance and interest in formal clinical cough assessment training. Kendrea L. (Focht) Garand, Mary Catherine Reilly, Dahye Choi, Rajarshi Dey, Julie Estis, and Grayson Hill evaluate community dwelling adults using Modified Barium Swallow Impairment Profile components for bolus hold type to assist in defining typical swallowing behaviors.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: The theme for this SIG 14 activity is examining challenges for faculty and students in communication sciences and disorders (CSD). Topics include (a) challenges faced by academic mothers in CSD programs; (b) challenges faced by faculty of color in CSD departments; and (c) examining microaggression endorsement in CSD students.
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This activity has two articles with different foci. The misophonia case study is a contribution to the evidence base for use of sound therapy and coping strategies in treating and managing misophonia. It also shares available tools for diagnosing misophonia. The study about using learning applications in intervention for children with hearing loss shares results of a speech-language pathologists' focus group. The focus group centered on using speech and language application features, benefits, and concerns in school-based service delivery
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: These SIG 17 Perspectives articles focus on the impact of the COVID-19 global pandemic on service provision and student training in four global contexts: Cyprus, South Africa, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Topics include the rise of telesupervision, telepractice in speech-language pathology (SLP), and distance learning in Cyprus during COVID-19; the effectiveness of SLP and related service treatment of patients with COVID-19 in an inpatient rehabilitation setting in the United States; the impact and transformation of an SLP university program in South Africa due to COVD-19; and the perspectives of parents/caregivers on SLP service provision during the pandemic for children born with cleft palates in the United Kingdom.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: The theme for this Perspectives activity is clinical considerations for working with multicultural populations in schools and the community. Topics include (a) assessment practices for multilingual children in schools, (b) school-based speech language pathologists working with interpreter-translators, and (c) factors associated with clear speech and accentedness in American English.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.25
Summary: This assemblage of articles provides information on interesting topics encountered in adult dysphagia practice. Aarthi Madhavan, Nicole Shuman, Claire Snyder, and Nicole Etter provide insight on the comparative consistency of the Eating Assessment Tool and Sydney Swallow Questionnaire scores for self-reported swallowing difficulties in a group of community-dwelling older adults completing both questionnaires. Georgina Papadopoulos-Nydam, Jana Maureen Rieger, and Gabriela Constantinescu evaluate the usability of a mobile health (mHealth) system designed for dysphagia exercise in persons with a history of stroke. Renata Mancopes, Fernanda Borowsky da Rosa, Lidia Lis Tomasi, Adriane S. Pasqualoto, and Catriona M. Steele demonstrate concern for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and share information regarding dysphagia in people with COPD, synthesizing knowledge both from the literature and from studies performed in the context of a multidisciplinary clinical pulmonary rehabilitation program abroad. Additionally, Talia H. Schwartz brings to light the importance and utility of the clinical swallow evaluation while caring for patients with COVID-19.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.55
Summary: The articles in this journal self-study discuss the literacy difficulties many children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) experience, with direct clinical implications for literacy assessment and intervention. The articles, which apply to children across the age spectrum, are from a 2021 forum published in Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, titled “Literacy in Autism—Across the Spectrum.”
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: These SIG 12 Perspectives articles provide information on current issues associated with display design and image complexity for individuals with cortical visual impairment and an in-depth overview of telepractice for people who rely on augmentative and alternative communication. Readers will be more adept at assessing and assisting children with cortical visual impairment and will have a better understanding of telepractice methods that can be used to improve virtual service delivery.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.25
Summary: These SIG 8 Perspectives articles focus on topics that are important in promoting public health audiology. In “Fundamentals of Epidemiology for the Audiologist,” Torre and Reavis provide an overview of basic epidemiologic concepts including study design, prevalence, incidence, risk ratios, and odds ratios. The authors emphasize that an understanding of epidemiology is crucial for audiologists for a variety of reasons, including to help them assess the quality of publications, evaluate and discuss the efficacy of screening methods, and evaluate and communicate risk factors for ear and hearing problems. In “Hearing Health Care Delivery Outside the Booth,” Gates, Hecht, Grantham, Fallon, and Martukovich review the literature on boothless audiometry and introduce current tools used to deliver hearing health care outside of the traditional clinic setting. From their review, the authors conclude that boothless audiometry technology provides an opportunity for audiologists to expand services to nontraditional settings such as waiting grooms and nursing homes, increasing access to care, early identification, and intervention, and therefore improving health outcomes.
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