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Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: This activity presents a variety of topics related to telepractice service provision. The first article offers a case study on the effects of a hybrid telepractice/onsite treatment program for a child who stutters. The following article discusses common technical issues encountered during telepractice and a process for managing them with English- and Spanish-speaking clients. The final article details the findings of a study on integrating technology through telepractice to support clients with dementia.
Credit(s): PDHs: 8.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.8
Summary: Studies have shown that grammar is foundational to a child’s communication and academic growth. SLPs who work with children with development language disorders (DLD) – regardless of the etiology of the disorder – need effective research-based grammar interventions in their toolbox. The articles in this journal self-study (selected from a Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools forum, “Morphosyntax Assessment and Intervention for Children”) describe evidence-based approaches for grammar assessment and treatment and provide tools to support goal-setting and progress monitoring. The articles discuss new approaches and practical implications for practice.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: This activity presents a diverse perspective, including four different speech science articles focused on a variety of topics. Kimball and Sayce discuss the pros and cons of research using behavior and functional assessment and treatment in the areas of speech science and voice, specifically their limitation in outlining etiology or explaining treatment resistance. They also provide an overview of genetic research approaches as a possible path forward to develop additional evidence-based treatment approaches. Neel reviews the production and perception of extralinguistic information regarding sex/gender, sexual orientation, age, non-native accent, regional and social dialect, and race and ethnicity. The article explores the literature in the above areas reviewing acoustical features and common misperceptions, concluding with instructional activities to enhance student awareness of indexical characteristics. McAllister et al. studied the effects of biofeedback for residual rhotic errors in a preliminary case series. Participants were five native English speakers who had not yet generalized rhotic production. Treatment consisted of either electropalatographic or visual-acoustic biofeedback using the Challenge Point Program software. Although participant responses to treatment were variable, the median effect size tended to exceed the minimum value considered clinically significant. Gritsyk et al. examined three measures to determine which best predicted change in production accuracy during a vowel learning task. Using 20 female college students, researchers administered three tasks: an oral stereognosis task, a bite block task using auditory making, and a new phonetic awareness task. The bite block task with auditory masking, measuring proprioceptive awareness, was the only task significantly related to performance in speech learning.
Credit(s): PDHs: 6.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.65
Summary: This journal self-study course explores best practices for dysphasia assessment and recent innovations in dysphagia treatment. The articles – from an American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology special issue “Select Papers From the 2018 Charleston Swallowing Conference at Northwestern University” – will help SLPs develop a deeper understanding of how to select appropriate treatment techniques, as well as why those techniques can be impactful in improving swallowing function. The articles delve deeply into past, current, and future treatment approaches for dysphagia and will be helpful for established clinicians as well as those who are new to the field of dysphagia assessment and treatment.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: The assemblage of articles presents clinicians with information on a variety of topics in dysphagia that can be utilized in practice. Laura L. Madhoun, Laura C. Merrell, Amanda Smith, Emily Snow, and Kristen M. Cherosky stress the importance of individualized and comprehensive feeding management for craniofacial anomalies through interdisciplinary collaboration. Lena G. Caesar and Meretu Kitila study clinicians’ perceptions and confidence with dysphagia service delivery. Aliaa Sabry, Amanda S. Mahoney, Shitong Mao, Yassin Khalifa, Ervin Sejdić, and James L. Coyle point out an objective way to assess laryngeal vestibule closure and opening at beside. Marie Jardine, Anna Miles, Jacqui Allen, and Rebecca Leonard give an interesting take of assessment of the aging swallow. Kelsey L. Thompson and Wanqing Zhang provide description and examples of mixed method research to comprehensively and holistically report of pediatric feeding disorders.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: This journal self-study focuses on rationale and techniques for enhancing clinicians’ cultural competence when working in Native American and tribal communities. The articles, originally published in a 2016 issue of Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups (SIG 14, Cultural and Linguistic Diversity), address the lasting impact of historical trauma on health and education; the importance of differentiated instruction; the perspective of a student with hearing loss who experiences traditional cultural education; and speech-language intervention programs and services in Native communities.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.25
Summary: Clinical practice for SLPs in health care settings has changed dramatically – and continues to evolve – due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This journal self-study highlights evidence-based best practices and considerations for clinicians providing care to patients with voice and upper airway disorders, tracheostomy, and head and neck cancer during the COVID-19 pandemic to maximize patient and clinician safety while ensuring efficacious care.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: This journal self-study course highlights the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on people with aphasia, patients with cognitive communication impairments, and patient-provider communication. The findings can inform decision-making and assist SLPs in optimizing treatment for communication challenges for patients with COVID-19 as well as those for whom treatment has been altered as a result of the pandemic.
Credit(s): PDHs: 6.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.65
Summary: This Perspectives activity focuses on the assessment and treatment of school-age students with social language deficits. Articles focus on conversational profiles for students with autism and intervention strategies appropriate for students within each profile; the benefit of using analog tasks with toddlers through adolescents to evaluate social communication abilities and guide intervention; best practices in assessing students with social communication deficits; and how effective commercially available standardized tests are for evaluating the social and pragmatic language deficits of students with social pragmatic communication disorder within and separate from autism.
Credit(s): PDHs: 7.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.7
Summary: SLPs are working with an increasing number of children and families who identify as bilingual, multilingual, or dual language learners (DLLs). This journal self-study explores how family expectations can impact the effectiveness of interventions, how expectations may vary across cultures, and what SLP interventions are considered evidence-based when working with DLLs and culturally and linguistically diverse families.
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