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Credit(s): PDHs: 9.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.9
Summary: This journal self-study course is composed of papers from a 2019 Research Forum, Advancing Statistical Methods in Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences. These selected articles provide advanced-level discussion about clinically relevant statistical methodologies to give speech-language pathologists a stronger foundation from which to analyze and understand the statistical research they come across to decide when and how to apply it in practice.
Credit(s): PDHs: 6.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.6
Summary: A 2019 Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools forum, Vocabulary Across the School Grades, presented evidence that strong vocabulary is important for students’ literacy and overall academic success across grade levels. The articles in this journal self-study course describe effective instructional strategies for facilitating vocabulary growth and improving reading comprehension in middle and high school students. The authors present recommendations and implications for practice.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: This journal self-study updates clinicians on advances in the field that can refine current diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). Two articles address assessment: One examines how type of stimuli can affect differential diagnosis of CAS, and the other identifies possible red flags in young children by examining characteristics of speech production in infants and toddlers who were later diagnosed with CAS. Two additional articles address advances in intervention for CAS: One looks at the efficacy of adding prosody as a treatment component, and the other explores a model-based treatment protocol.
Credit(s): PDHs: 6.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.6
Summary: This journal self-study course compares language performance in children with and without cochlear implants from preschool to 6th grade. The articles examine levels of language from phonology to prosody, offering insights into areas of strength and weakness as well as clinical directions. The first article examines consonant acquisition patterns based on hearing exposure. The second and third articles compare morphosyntactic, lexical, and phonological awareness profiles, the effect of literacy on each language skill, and types of errors produced in school-age children with and without cochlear implants. The fourth article explores differences in word-learning strategies that could affect lexical development and offers clinical suggestions based on these findings. The final article explores children’s abilities to discriminate emotional intent based on suprasegmental characteristics in the speech signal.
Credit(s): PDHs: 9.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.95
Summary: This journal self-study includes select papers that were presented at the 2017 Clinical Aphasiology Conference in Snowbird, Utah. The articles reflect the wide array of topics presented on aphasia treatment, tools, and outcomes. Also included is an article that ties ideas from the conference keynote to research in communication disorders. Clinicians can expand their knowledge by learning about the current state of aphasia research.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.55
Summary: Literacy skills begin to develop in early childhood, and addressing deficits in reading and writing skills early may prevent later problems in school. This journal self-study explores special situations that may affect literacy skills, including the presence of speech sound disorders, hearing impairment, and cultural and/or socioeconomic differences. It also includes articles that discuss intervention techniques to improve phonological awareness, an important emergent literacy skill. Clinicians can use this information to improve reading and writing assessment and treatment techniques for preschool and early elementary school children.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: The articles included in this journal self-study include evidence-based assessment and intervention practices for children with cleft lip and/or palate, a specialized population with which many SLPs have limited experience. The first article describes a clinical measure for quantifying nasal air emission using a nasal accelerometer. The second article illustrates the developmental timeline of typical velopharyngeal function in speech production and then compares it to what is seen in toddlers with repaired cleft. The third article offers treatment efficacy data for a naturalistic intervention with phonological emphasis for toddlers with cleft lip and/or palate. The final article examines a number of factors that can influence language development in internationally adopted children with cleft lip and/or palate.
Credit(s): PDHs: 6.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.6
Summary: Children with speech sound disorders make up a large part of the caseload for many SLPs who work with preschool and school-age children. Speech sound disorders not only affect a child’s ability to communicate at a young age but also may lead to later speech and literacy difficulties. This journal self-study explores issues related to managing speech sound disorders, including assessment and treatment options. It also includes articles that identify predictors of future speech and literacy problems. Clinicians can use this information to help identify appropriate assessment tools and potential treatment options, as well as counsel parents and teachers of children who may be at risk for continuing speech and academic difficulties.
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