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Results 11 - 20 of 100
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: This SIG 2 activity, participants explore aspects of service delivery and advocacy for people with aphasia that are innovative and/or unique. The first article describes the creation of community aphasia groups and includes guidance for creating aphasia-friendly materials for a variety of purposes. The second article describes the challenges of people with aphasia in navigating the justice system and discusses strategies to support their success within that unique environment. The third article describes the nature of verbal short-term memory impairment in people with aphasia, methods of assessment, and potential directions for treatment.
Credit(s): PDHs: 6.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.6
Summary: This SIG 1 Perspectives activity focuses on assessing and treating students with intellectual disability (ID) in the areas of language and literacy. The first article discusses the primary components of a parent-implemented language intervention for children with fragile X syndrome. The second article discusses emergent and conventional literacy skills and the strengths and challenges in reading and spelling for adolescents with ID. The third article describes the key components and modifications that can be utilized in narrative interventions when working with individuals that are diagnosed with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The final article provides the parents’ perspectives of the home and school literacy experiences of children with ID in preschool.
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: The article in this SIG 6 activity focuses on the audiologic variations seen among patients undergoing the same type of ototoxic drug treatment (cisplatin). Results show a large amount of audiologic outcome variability among the two patients examined, despite similar demographic factors, drug treatments, and types of cancer. Factors relating to ototoxic susceptibility are discussed, and the importance of otoxicity monitoring programs for early detection of audiologic change is highlighted.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: This course contains four articles that address current demands in geriatric care, including impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and the shifting demographics reflecting an aging population.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: This SIG 19 activity bundles four articles providing perspectives on a broad variety of topics in speech-language pathology. First, Holt provides an overview of current and historical discussions of gender and race, challenging the reader to accept that one’s perspective is indebted to a specific belief system. Readers are to evaluate how gender and race are used to categorize people and examine whether a member of a marginalized or minoritized group affects that person’s access to or use of intervention services. Next, Cox and Koenig define speech privacy and provide a brief history and applications in the health care setting. A general perspective is outlined, including threats to speech privacy, and speakers who use an electrolarynx are used as an example to highlight specific issues clinicians may encounter. Ramanarayanan et al. discuss the use of speech as a biomarker in therapy and research. In summary, robustness of analytics—specificity, diversity, and physiological interpretability—must be further developed. Finally, Weerathunge, Tomassi, and Stepp review a number of populations with voice disorders that have been studied using altered auditory feedback. Many have hyperactive auditory feedback responses and the differing underling reasons are reviewed. Therapy considerations are also described.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: It is well known within our field that identifying voice and upper airway specialized training opportunities and subsequent positions is challenging, competitive, and sometimes elusive. In this SIG 3 activity, various pathways to specializing in voice and upper airway disorders are explored from the viewpoint of different authors at various stages of their careers. The hope is to make the process of specialization more transparent and share components that have contributed to success, while also highlighting the diversity of training and experience that is so important in our field.
Credit(s): PDHs: 6.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.65
Summary: The articles in this journal self-study focus on the characterization and clinical management of aphasia, one theme that researchers explored in the 2020 Clinical Aphasiology Conference (CAC) forum. Published in the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, these articles present cutting-edge research and discussion on word finding difficulties, sematic processing, and spoken discourse.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: These four SIG 13 articles provide information for dysphagia practice. They address a unique array of special populations and challenges in patient care involving swallowing and feeding difficulties.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: The theme for this SIG 14 activity is self-reported confidence and knowledge between multilingual and monolingual speech-language pathologists in working with culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) individuals and assessment considerations when working with individuals who speak a language other than English. Topics include (a) examining differences between self-reported confidence and knowledge in multilingual and monolingual speech language pathologists; (b) nonword repetition in assessment; and (c) sound sequencing characteristics in words of children who speak German.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: This SIG 11 Perspectives activity addresses aspects of clinical supervision and administration beyond the “Big Nine” clinical competencies. In the first article, the author discusses the significance of emotional resilience and provides practical strategies to encourage resiliency in supervisees. The second article explains the significance of cultural competence and the value of open conversations within supervisory relationships. Finally, the third article highlights key skills used in intentional and reflective supervision.
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