ASHA Learning Pass

Visit the ASHA coronavirus resource pages to stay on top of all the latest resources and supports specific to issues related to COVID-19.

Filter Courses By
Experience
Instructional Level
Results 1 - 10 of 24
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: This activity is a grouping of studies related to the understanding stuttering throughout the life span. The activity is based on articles related to attentional focus on motor control in people who stutter (PWS) and the relationship to social stress, acoustic measures of emotion in children who stutter, a study of covert stuttering throughout the lifespan, vocational stereotyping of PWS by human resource preprofessionals, and audio-based podcasts to assist in self-help for PWS. Together, these articles investigate important measures in understanding stuttering and how researchers and clinicians can better understand the condition of stuttering.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: This activity includes two articles related to language and literacy intervention for children with hearing loss and deafness. In the first article, Stephanie Mary Raymond and Tring D. Spencer investigate the effect of narrative language intervention on the narrative retelling skills and vocabulary use of children with hearing loss. In the second article, Krystal L. Werfel and Sarah Lawrence describe specific considerations for print-referencing interventions for children with hearing loss along with a case study. The respective authors conclude that print referencing, with specific considerations for children with hearing loss, may be an effective emergent literacy intervention to increase conceptual print knowledge for children preschool-age with hearing loss; and narrative intervention is promising for facilitating language skills improvement for children with hearing loss. Both studies require replication for their findings.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: For people experiencing dizziness, what are possible options for vestibular and balance rehabilitation? This self-study from Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups (SIG 7) addresses treatment choices in vestibular and balance rehabilitation, the state of the evidence on their efficacy, and future directions for interdisciplinary research and practice. Written by clinicians and scholars with expertise in audiology and physical therapy, the four articles present an interdisciplinary and life span approach to vestibular and balance rehabilitation for children and adults. The first article by Christy is on the use of vestibular and balance rehabilitation therapy for dizziness in children. Next, the review by Herdman focuses on the evolution of vestibular function tests and rehabilitation for major vestibular disorders as well as areas in which research and clinical practice may grow in the future. In Holmberg, the relatively new but common diagnosis of persistent postural-perceptual dizziness (PPPD) is presented in terms of its pathophysiology, differential diagnosis, and treatment protocols. Finally, Clendaniel provides a review on the use of vestibular rehabilitation in the treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Included are detailed photos and illustrations of current techniques and exercises. As described in the introduction to the forum by Guest Editor Neil Shepard, PhD, “It is hoped that these four articles will provide a needed look at vestibular and balance rehabilitation therapy (VBRT) so the audiologist can serve as a productive member of the treatment team and have a good understanding as to everything that
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.25
Summary: This collection of articles presents clinicians with information on some of the most timesensitive topics in dysphagia care of utmost relevance, particularly in the current COVID- 19 pandemic. Firstly, Liza Blumenfeld, Lisa Evangelista, Maggie Kuhn, Kristen Linnemeyer, Nogah Nativ-Zeltzer, and Heather Starmer provide best practice recommendations on the management of patients with head and neck cancers from the speech-language pathology perspective amid COVID-19. Authors Hema Desia and Jennifer Raminick then provide recommendations for safer feeding of infants on high flow oxygen therapy due to acute respiratory failure. Lastly, authors Grainne Brady and Justin Roe, Kellyn Hall and Leslie Johnson, and Annette Askren and Marnie Kershner discuss different aspects of clinician–patient collaborated dysphagia care delivery models and their impact on successful outcomes.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: First, Julie Case and Maria Grigos provide a review of speech motor control literature in childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) and give clinical implications to the assessment and treatment of CAS. Second, Kristen Allison reviews approaches to measuring speech intelligibility in children with motor speech disorders. Third, Tricia McCabe, Donna Thomas, and Elizabeth Murray describe Rapid Syllable Transition Treatment (ReST) as a treatment for CAS. Fourth, Nancy Tarshis, Michelle Winner, and Pamela Crooke explore how communication challenges in CAS impact social competency and how speech motor challenges impact social development. Finally, Nina Benway and Jonathan Preston evaluate if features of CAS in the literature could be replicated in a sample of school-age children. Readers will describe how speech motor skills have been found to change with practice in CAS, list the linguistic factors that can influence intelligibility, describe the quality of the research that supports ReST, explain ways to consider social cognition in therapy for CAS, and rank the speech features that distinguish the narrow phonetic transcriptions of children with CAS and speech sound disorders.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 10) articles explore several issues related to student success. Sylvan, Brock, Perkins, and Garret examine prerequisites required by graduate programs in speech-language pathology across the United States. Roitsch, Murphy, and Raymer investigate the relationship between executive functions and academic outcomes in speech-language pathology graduate students. Richardson, Roberts, and Victor explore ways to predict the clinical success of graduate students studying speechlanguage pathology. Look, Shoemaker, Hoepner, and Blake discover benefits of engaging undergraduate students in research.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: In these Perspectives (SIG 4) articles, two of the articles relate to patterns of disfluency in young bilingual children—one of these two articles adds the patterns of stuttering in young bilingual children that stutter. The third article uses a thematic analysis to help understand why adults who stutter attended self-help groups.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 2) articles focus on approaches for early identification, service delivery, and treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI). In the first article, Juliet Haarbauer-Drupa and Michael Brink describe the existing literature on preschool children with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and illustrate a model of care for a community. Next, Lori Cook, Nellie Caulkins, and Sandra Chapman explore the potential for cognitive training delivered via telepractice to enhance cognitive performance after mild TBI in adolescence. Lastly, Mary Kennedy offers an update on the evidence the provides possible explanations for speech-language pathologists’ experiences while implementing a coaching approach with college students with TBI.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 5) articles focus on the status of academic and clinical training related to cleft and craniofacial conditions, a module training series for addressing the gaps in current educational roadmaps, and resources and best practice recommendations are provided.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 8) articles cover a wide range of audiology and public health research and clinical topics. There are three original research reports and one clinical review. In the first research report, Roman et al. examine the impact of reduced audibility and speaker voice on the mini-mental state examination score in a group of young adults without cognitive impairment. Next, Beamer et al. conduct a preliminary study to investigate the role of a hearing loss prevention education strategies in an active duty military population. Reavis et al. estimate the association between tinnitus and self-reported depression symptoms and between tinnitus and perceived anxiety in a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults. The final article by Henry and Manning is a review article on sound therapy approaches and clinical options for tinnitus management.
<< < 1 2 3 >>