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Presenter(s): Gloria Soto, PhD
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: In this session, the speaker reviews the characteristics of culturally and linguistically responsive AAC practices and presents evidence-based strategies for culturally appropriate bilingual AAC assessment and intervention. The speaker discusses partnering with families to determine values, needs, priorities, and resources when implementing AAC. This course is a recorded session from the 2021 online conference “Expanding AAC: Accessible Strategies for Functional Communication.”
Presenter(s): Jill E. Senner, PhD, CCC-SLP; Matthew R. Baud, MS, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: Given the landscape of hundreds of apps, speech-generating devices, low-tech options, and no-tech strategies, SLPs who do not typically complete AAC assessments may wonder who to refer for an AAC an assessment and how they can contribute to the assessment process. This session reviews the AAC assessment process, with an emphasis on feature matching and consideration of the individual’s current and future needs. This course is a recorded session from the 2021 online conference “Expanding AAC: Accessible Strategies for Functional Communication.”
Presenter(s): Vicki Haddix, MS, CCC-SLP; Kevin Williams
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: Effective collaboration among individuals who use AAC and their families, communication partners at school/work, and those in the community can promote positive outcomes for the AAC communicators. This session defines what successful information exchanges can look like and explores who in the community an SLP may want to include as collaborators. The presenter shares strategies for effective and efficient collaboration across the AAC communicator’s family, school/work life, and broader community. This course is a recorded session from the 2021 online conference “Expanding AAC: Accessible Strategies for Functional Communication.”
Presenter(s): Kate R. Ahern, MS
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: Having knowledgeable and supported caregivers—including parents, siblings, care attendants, home aides, home nurses, and extended family—is vital to an AAC user’s success. New opportunities for virtual sessions allow a level of home involvement and support previously made difficult by time and logistical constraints. This session discusses practical strategies for teaching and supporting home caregivers. This course is a recorded session from the 2021 online conference “Expanding AAC: Accessible Strategies for Functional Communication.”
Presenter(s): Cynthia J. Cress, PhD, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.15
Summary: Learning to gesture or use aided AAC for intentional communication with a partner is challenging for some infants and toddlers with complex communication needs. This session explores a variety of intervention strategies that improve pre-intentional and intentional communication skills using various AAC modalities and some of which incorporate families and caregivers. The speaker shares live illustrations and video examples of young children who have various difficulties with pre-intentional communication and problem solves about how intervention can structure the learner’s experiences to fill in gaps. This course is a recorded session from the 2021 online conference “Expanding AAC: Accessible Strategies for Functional Communication.”
Presenter(s): Vicki Clarke, MS, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This session examine the often-daunting process of moving a child who is minimally verbal or nonverbal from a basic to a full-featured AAC system. The session covers the selection, use, and goal-setting process for a basic, functional communication and language development system while planning for assessment for and implementation of a fuller system. The speaker shares suggestions for designing effective intervention sessions and ideas for helping the team get on board. This course is a recorded session from the 2021 online conference “Expanding AAC: Accessible Strategies for Functional Communication.”
Presenter(s): Kendrea L. (Focht) Garand, PhD, CScD, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, CBIS, CCRE
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: This on demand webinar addresses the clinical utility of a clinical swallow examination (CSE) for individuals with suspected swallowing impairment. The speaker discusses the power of the CSE, which comes from employing a systematic assessment to enhance clinical decision-making. The webinar dives into the critical components for a multidimensional CSE applicable across patient populations and settings.
Presenter(s): Oneida Chi, MS, CCC-SLP; Rafael (Rafa) Brown Sampayo, BA; Zavier Lord Williams, MS, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: As visibility for transgender and gender nonconforming (TGNC) folks increases, audiologists and SLPs may wonder how to ensure their practice is inclusive and affirming. This on demand webinar explores culturally competent and inclusive care for gender diverse individuals. The course includes evidence-based practices, knowledge building about TGNC identities, strategies for maintaining safe spaces, and interactive case studies
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: This activity presents a diverse perspective, including four different speech science articles focused on a variety of topics. Kimball and Sayce discuss the pros and cons of research using behavior and functional assessment and treatment in the areas of speech science and voice, specifically their limitation in outlining etiology or explaining treatment resistance. They also provide an overview of genetic research approaches as a possible path forward to develop additional evidence-based treatment approaches. Neel reviews the production and perception of extralinguistic information regarding sex/gender, sexual orientation, age, non-native accent, regional and social dialect, and race and ethnicity. The article explores the literature in the above areas reviewing acoustical features and common misperceptions, concluding with instructional activities to enhance student awareness of indexical characteristics. McAllister et al. studied the effects of biofeedback for residual rhotic errors in a preliminary case series. Participants were five native English speakers who had not yet generalized rhotic production. Treatment consisted of either electropalatographic or visual-acoustic biofeedback using the Challenge Point Program software. Although participant responses to treatment were variable, the median effect size tended to exceed the minimum value considered clinically significant. Gritsyk et al. examined three measures to determine which best predicted change in production accuracy during a vowel learning task. Using 20 female college students, researchers administered three tasks: an oral stereognosis task, a bite block task using auditory making, and a new phonetic awareness task. The bite block task with auditory masking, measuring proprioceptive awareness, was the only task significantly related to performance in speech learning.
Credit(s): PDHs: 6.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.65
Summary: This journal self-study course explores best practices for dysphasia assessment and recent innovations in dysphagia treatment. The articles – from an American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology special issue “Select Papers From the 2018 Charleston Swallowing Conference at Northwestern University” – will help SLPs develop a deeper understanding of how to select appropriate treatment techniques, as well as why those techniques can be impactful in improving swallowing function. The articles delve deeply into past, current, and future treatment approaches for dysphagia and will be helpful for established clinicians as well as those who are new to the field of dysphagia assessment and treatment.
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