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Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: This Perspectives activity contains three articles, all with emphasis on social considerations in the elderly, with emphases on risk factors for dementia and treatment of Parkinson’s Disease. The first article seeks to describe the validity and reliability of the Fun and Social Engagement Evaluation (FUSE). The authors explain that this is an important topic because lack of physical activity and low social engagement are risk factors for dementia and could impact the rate of decline associated with dementia. Furthermore, physical inactivity has been identified by the World Health Organization as a leading risk factor for global mortality. Nursing home residents were evaluated using the FUSE during “Bingocize” sessions; the program combines a bingo-like game and physical activity and is scaled for differing cognitive and physical levels of ability. Results indicate that the FUSE is a valid and reliable method to measure engagement, and this is important because this measure can be recommended to nursing homes to measure engagement, as well as used in future research. The second article attempts to determine which of a variety of factors were associated with communicative participation and measured this based on the social network size of an individual. The author feels that this is important because social isolation is linked to cognitive decline and depression, both of which are risk factors for developing dementia. This study builds on previous research related to social participation and communication as predictors of successful health outcomes. Two research questions are addressed: What numbers of communication partners exist in the self-reported social network of older adults? And what factors are included in a model for predicting the social network size of older adults? They studied 337 seniors in Central Arkansas by collecting interviews and conducting standardized assessments. Results indicate that cognition and education are factors that are related to communicative participation. The results of this study, along with additional literature on this topic, suggest that there is benefit in recognizing a decrease in communicative participation and the role that cognitive decline may play in restricting communicative participation. The final article describes the program developed at Long Island University Brooklyn, which is multidisciplinary in nature, in contrast to previous treatment models which have traditionally focused on a monodisciplinary approach. In the past decade, there has been a shift from monodisciplinary models and research to a multidisciplinary approach, which is more effective in holistically treating the multifaceted effects of Parkinson’s Disease (PD), resulting in better outcomes and social participation for individuals with PD. The article describes use of the Fitness for PD exercise program twice per week for ten weeks, targeting strength, balance, agility, stretching, and aerobic exercises. Students at the university are engaged in taking vitals, facilitating resistance training, and enhancing safety; students and participants find benefit in working together. One hour Speech Clinic for PD sessions are conducted after each fitness class, including voice evaluations and therapy focusing on maximizing voice production and improving breathing patterns. The first half of sessions are conducted in game format, which encourages interpersonal interactions and collaboration and facilitates carryover into conversational contexts. Sessions incorporate Motor Learning Principles, LSVT LOUD, and respiratory exercises. The second half of sessions are conducted in whole-group format and speech practice in small groups.
Presenter(s): Christina M Callahan, AuD, CCC-A; Harvey B Abrams, PhD, CCC-A
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: This course is the first in a set of practical programs that address specific aspects of remote practice (telepractice) in audiology. This initial course explores audiologists' perceptions of barriers to providing telehealth services and introduces the Health Belief Model (HBM) and Transtheoretical model to assess readiness for remote service provision. The course includes an on-demand recording and a worksheet activity/tool to help you identify needs and barriers as you consider how you can incorporate teleaudiology into your practice.
Presenter(s): Harvey B Abrams, PhD; James W Hall, PhD
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This course includes two presentations that introduce strategies and tools for remote hearing assessment, including online and smartphone tests of hearing, remote pure tone audiometry, speech audiometry, and evaluation of peripheral and central auditory dysfunction in pediatric and adult populations. The course is part of a set of practical programs that address specific aspects of remote practice in audiology.
Presenter(s): Tommy Evans, AuD, CCC-A
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This course demonstrates how Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center is using telehealth applications to address the needs of children with hearing loss during the COVID-19 pandemic and into the future, including remote hearing aid evaluations, fittings, programming, repairs, and functional benefit assessments. The course is one in a set of practical programs that address specific aspects of remote practice in audiology.
Presenter(s): Angela J Loucks, AuD, CCC-A, MNZAS; Donna Geffner, PhD, CCC-A/SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This course presents a methodology that allows audiologists to provide (central) auditory processing testing remotely. The course discusses the advantages, disadvantages, and pitfalls of remote testing as well as technology and other requirements. The course is one in a set of practical programs that address specific aspects of remote practice in audiology.
Presenter(s): Christina M Callahan, AuD, CCC-A
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: This course explores realistic scenarios audiologists may encounter when remotely fitting hearing aids for adults. The course discusses strategies for successful hearing aid fitting via teleaudiology and identifies challenges and how to address them when they occur. The course is one in a set of practical programs that address specific aspects of remote practice in audiology.
Presenter(s): Tim Boyd, MPH
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: This course provides an overview of policy issues and trends in audiologists' use of telepractice, including an overview of changes to state telepractice law implemented during the COVID-19 pandemic.  The course is one in a set of practical programs that address specific aspects of remote practice in audiology. 
Presenter(s): Natalie Comas, BSpPath, LSLS Cert. AVT
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: Adults who are deaf or hard or hearing, as well as families of children with hearing conditions, often report that they struggle to understand the results of hearing assessments, make decisions about next steps, and convey the outcomes and implications to others. This course introduces the Ida Institute's new conversation guide, My Hearing Explained, a tool to help hearing care professionals (both audiologists and SLPs specializing in hearing care) present hearing test results in a person-centered way and help patients and their families make decisions that are right for them.
Credit(s): PDHs: 6.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.6
Summary: Concussion - or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) - is a unique injury that is different from more severe brain injury, and addressing the associated cognitive deficits requires personalized, targeted interventions These articles discuss research and practical implications for the management of cognitive symptoms of mTBI, including defining the role of the SLP on interdisciplinary management teams, exploring specific assessment and treatment strategies, and emphasizing functional, personalized goals. The articles are from a 2021 American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology forum "Interdisciplinary Management of Concussion or Mild TBI." The articles provide evidence and strategies to increase clinician confidence and effectiveness when working with individuals with concussion or mTBI.
Presenter(s): Kathleen M. Cienkowski, PhD, CCC-A
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: There has been a renewed interest in the provision of aural rehabilitation (AR) services as part of patient-centered hearing health care. Aural rehabilitation is a holistic approach to the management of hearing loss that may include patient education, fitting of devices, and auditory training exercises. Although audiologists may recognize the benefits of comprehensive AR, questions may remain about how to measure functional outcomes of these services. This course reviews functional outcome assessments for aural rehabilitation and how to incorporate these measures into everyday practice to enhance patient success.
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