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Presenter(s): Kim Murza, PhD, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.15
Summary: To make a difference for our students we can’t work alone; yet, collaboration is hard. This course – part of a series that proposes practical approaches to overcoming the big challenges school-based SLPs face – focuses on concrete, realistic strategies for making collaboration work in schools, using case scenarios to explore different implementations of collaboration. The course guides you through practice activities designed to identify solutions tailored to your environment and the unique communication needs of your students. The course also includes strategies that will make you a more effective advocate at all levels – for your students, yourself, and the concept of collaborative services in general.
Presenter(s): Kim Murza, PhD, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: Working at the “top of the license” requires SLPs to take a close look at their workload while balancing the need to support a collaborative school culture. This course – the first in a series that proposes practical approaches to overcoming the big challenges school-based SLPs face – will help you analyze your workload while considering the question, “What really requires my expertise?” The speaker will help you explore the underlying issues you face in your school and examine the many hats SLPs wear. Before you can determine what could be, it’s important to first figure out what is, and this course is your starting point.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: This self-study features highly read and cited audiology research articles published in 2018 in ASHA’s scholarly journals. Topics reflect the diversity of the field and include: (1) what users need to know to effectively manage hearing aids, (2) how language skills develop in children with cochlear implants, and (3) information available on social media about tinnitus.
Presenter(s): Lori Burkhead Morgan, PhD, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: This video course will focus on using evidence-based exercise practices in swallowing rehabilitation. The speaker will discuss the theoretical background and evidence for exercise science and then present exercise-based techniques that SLPs can implement with patients. Specific topics will include motor learning, skill vs. strength training, and muscle structure and function. Specific exercises will be discussed, including isometric lingual strength training, expiratory muscle strength training, chin tuck against resistance, Lee Silverman Voice Treatment, and more.
Credit(s): PDHs: 6.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.6
Summary: This journal self-study course compares language performance in children with and without cochlear implants from preschool to 6th grade. The articles examine levels of language from phonology to prosody, offering insights into areas of strength and weakness as well as clinical directions. The first article examines consonant acquisition patterns based on hearing exposure. The second and third articles compare morphosyntactic, lexical, and phonological awareness profiles, the effect of literacy on each language skill, and types of errors produced in school-age children with and without cochlear implants. The fourth article explores differences in word-learning strategies that could affect lexical development and offers clinical suggestions based on these findings. The final article explores children’s abilities to discriminate emotional intent based on suprasegmental characteristics in the speech signal.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: SLPs who work with children who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) need a broad base of knowledge in evidence-based assessment, system designs, and implementation practices, particularly as technological innovations in AAC proliferate. This journal self-study explores of all of the above. The first article provides a useful framework for assessment that distinguishes essential components according to the child’s motor and cognitive abilities. Two articles examine design features: The first examines consistency of symbol location to increase efficiency, and the second looks at characteristics of naturalistic displays and their effects on gaze behavior according to clinical profiles. The final article in this self-study reviews practices for training communication partners of children who use AAC.
Presenter(s): Nancy B. Swigert, MA, CCC-SLP, BCS-S
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: This course examines the impacts of impaired anatomy and physiology on swallowing safety and efficiency in adults. The course is designed to aid clinicians in managing the evaluation and treatment of adults with oropharyngeal dysphagia. The speaker discusses the functions of specific structures, spaces, and muscles related to swallowing as well as the relationship between esophageal and oropharyngeal signs and symptoms.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: The articles in this journal self-study provide clinically applicable evidence and critiques of current practices for working with older adults, with the goal of encouraging clinicians to go beyond treating impairments in isolation and instead to use patient-centered practices to increase life participation and quality of life. Two of the articles closely examine situations in long-term care facilities: (1) differing perceptions of food texture modification by professionals and staff and (2) improving communication opportunities for residents with aphasia in traditional long-term care facilities. The second two articles analyze interventions for individuals with cognitive impairment, addressing (1) improving behavioral symptoms by treating hearing loss and (2) providing direct communication intervention for individuals with moderate to severe dementia.
Presenter(s): Mary O’Gara, MA, CCC-SLP; Sarah M. Richards, MS, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: Children with cleft palate often require speech intervention post-surgical repair to normalize their phonological learning of the high intraoral pressure consonants. In many cases, SLPs may find it challenging to differentiate between speech characteristics that are a result of persisting velopharyngeal insufficiency and those that are learned, habituated speech behaviors. This webinar addresses both structural and speech challenges that can co-exist in children with repaired cleft palate so that SLPs in all clinical settings can help these children achieve their best outcomes for speech production.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: This journal self-study focuses on several aspects of patient care and management for practitioners who serve children who are deaf or hard of hearing. The articles, originally published in a 2014 issue of Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, discuss the unique needs of children with mild, minimal, and/or unilateral hearing loss; the effects of fatigue on children with hearing loss; and the importance of monitoring speech-language performance and progress as well as hearing aid use in this population.
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