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Presenter(s): Jace A. Wolfe, PhD, CCC-A
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.15
Summary: There is not much consensus or standardization in the practices professionals use to measure outcomes for cochlear implant (CI) recipients. This session examines outcome measurement, providing clear and concise recommendations for assessment of outcomes in adult and pediatric CI recipients. This course is a recorded session from the 2019 online conference “Audiology 2019: Cochlear Implants.”
Presenter(s): Sarah A. Sydlowski, AuD, PhD
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This session discusses the current parameters for identifying cochlear implant candidates and provides an update on cochlear implantation that aims to clarify misconceptions that may influence referral patterns. The speaker points out resources that clinicians can use to offer comprehensive, authoritative information on cochlear implantation candidacy to their patients. This course is a recorded session from the 2019 online conference “Audiology 2019: Cochlear Implants.”
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: This journal self-study updates clinicians on advances in the field that can refine current diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). Two articles address assessment: One examines how type of stimuli can affect differential diagnosis of CAS, and the other identifies possible red flags in young children by examining characteristics of speech production in infants and toddlers who were later diagnosed with CAS. Two additional articles address advances in intervention for CAS: One looks at the efficacy of adding prosody as a treatment component, and the other explores a model-based treatment protocol.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: This journal self-study emphasizes clinical decision-making in swallowing and dysphagia management. The articles focus on using data to make clinical decisions, finding noninvasive ways to screen healthy adults, and patient-reported side effects and tolerability of a specific assessment technique.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: This self-study features highly read and cited audiology research articles published in 2018 in ASHA’s scholarly journals. Topics reflect the diversity of the field and include: (1) what users need to know to effectively manage hearing aids, (2) how language skills develop in children with cochlear implants, and (3) information available on social media about tinnitus.
Presenter(s): Lori Burkhead Morgan, PhD, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: This video course will focus on using evidence-based exercise practices in swallowing rehabilitation. The speaker will discuss the theoretical background and evidence for exercise science and then present exercise-based techniques that SLPs can implement with patients. Specific topics will include motor learning, skill vs. strength training, and muscle structure and function. Specific exercises will be discussed, including isometric lingual strength training, expiratory muscle strength training, chin tuck against resistance, Lee Silverman Voice Treatment, and more.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: SLPs who work with children who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) need a broad base of knowledge in evidence-based assessment, system designs, and implementation practices, particularly as technological innovations in AAC proliferate. This journal self-study explores of all of the above. The first article provides a useful framework for assessment that distinguishes essential components according to the child’s motor and cognitive abilities. Two articles examine design features: The first examines consistency of symbol location to increase efficiency, and the second looks at characteristics of naturalistic displays and their effects on gaze behavior according to clinical profiles. The final article in this self-study reviews practices for training communication partners of children who use AAC.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: The articles in this journal self-study provide clinically applicable evidence and critiques of current practices for working with older adults, with the goal of encouraging clinicians to go beyond treating impairments in isolation and instead to use patient-centered practices to increase life participation and quality of life. Two of the articles closely examine situations in long-term care facilities: (1) differing perceptions of food texture modification by professionals and staff and (2) improving communication opportunities for residents with aphasia in traditional long-term care facilities. The second two articles analyze interventions for individuals with cognitive impairment, addressing (1) improving behavioral symptoms by treating hearing loss and (2) providing direct communication intervention for individuals with moderate to severe dementia.
Presenter(s): Mary O’Gara, MA, CCC-SLP; Sarah M. Richards, MS, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: Children with cleft palate often require speech intervention post-surgical repair to normalize their phonological learning of the high intraoral pressure consonants. In many cases, SLPs may find it challenging to differentiate between speech characteristics that are a result of persisting velopharyngeal insufficiency and those that are learned, habituated speech behaviors. This webinar addresses both structural and speech challenges that can co-exist in children with repaired cleft palate so that SLPs in all clinical settings can help these children achieve their best outcomes for speech production.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: This journal self-study focuses on several aspects of patient care and management for practitioners who serve children who are deaf or hard of hearing. The articles, originally published in a 2014 issue of Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, discuss the unique needs of children with mild, minimal, and/or unilateral hearing loss; the effects of fatigue on children with hearing loss; and the importance of monitoring speech-language performance and progress as well as hearing aid use in this population.
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