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Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: This Perspectives (SIG 1) forum focuses on supporting students in a school setting in improving morphological skills. Authors discuss key components of intervention, collaboration with other professionals, and practical strategies for clinicians.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: This activity is a grouping of studies related to the understanding stuttering throughout the life span. The activity is based on articles related to attentional focus on motor control in people who stutter (PWS) and the relationship to social stress, acoustic measures of emotion in children who stutter, a study of covert stuttering throughout the lifespan, vocational stereotyping of PWS by human resource preprofessionals, and audio-based podcasts to assist in self-help for PWS. Together, these articles investigate important measures in understanding stuttering and how researchers and clinicians can better understand the condition of stuttering.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: This Perspectives (SIG 1) forum focuses on developmental language disorder (DLD), including the history of terminology changes in the field, the relationship of specific language impairment and DLD, diagnostic criteria in the field of speech language pathology, and an examination of DLD through a school-based lens.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: First, Julie Case and Maria Grigos provide a review of speech motor control literature in childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) and give clinical implications to the assessment and treatment of CAS. Second, Kristen Allison reviews approaches to measuring speech intelligibility in children with motor speech disorders. Third, Tricia McCabe, Donna Thomas, and Elizabeth Murray describe Rapid Syllable Transition Treatment (ReST) as a treatment for CAS. Fourth, Nancy Tarshis, Michelle Winner, and Pamela Crooke explore how communication challenges in CAS impact social competency and how speech motor challenges impact social development. Finally, Nina Benway and Jonathan Preston evaluate if features of CAS in the literature could be replicated in a sample of school-age children. Readers will describe how speech motor skills have been found to change with practice in CAS, list the linguistic factors that can influence intelligibility, describe the quality of the research that supports ReST, explain ways to consider social cognition in therapy for CAS, and rank the speech features that distinguish the narrow phonetic transcriptions of children with CAS and speech sound disorders.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 16) addresses important issues for the speech-language pathologist (SLP) in working in the school setting, including assessing bilingual students, grammar interventions for school-aged students, the comfort level of SLPs when working with students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and the impact of professional development on literacy knowledge and practice.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: This Perspectives issue focuses on clinical considerations for working with children and adults from culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) backgrounds. Topics presented include (a) effects of clear speech on perceptions of accentedness in American English, (b) ethnographic interviewing in clinical practice, (c) language errors in bilinguals under background noise and quiet conditions, and (d) assessment of speech sound disorders in school-aged children from CLD backgrounds.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 2) articles focus on approaches for early identification, service delivery, and treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI). In the first article, Juliet Haarbauer-Drupa and Michael Brink describe the existing literature on preschool children with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and illustrate a model of care for a community. Next, Lori Cook, Nellie Caulkins, and Sandra Chapman explore the potential for cognitive training delivered via telepractice to enhance cognitive performance after mild TBI in adolescence. Lastly, Mary Kennedy offers an update on the evidence the provides possible explanations for speech-language pathologists’ experiences while implementing a coaching approach with college students with TBI.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 7) articles address therapy, patient education/counseling, and novel eHealth programs to serve clients across the lifespan. The topic of multisensory integration is addressed with a review of cognitive neuroscience literature and recommendations are made for therapy protocols for infants and children with hearing loss. There is a review of the development and outcomes of a multimedia education program for adults with hearing loss. The use of eHealth in patient-centered care for adults with hearing loss is considered for current practice and its future directions. Authors discuss considerations for the use of remote microphone technology by the oldest generation of patients. Finally, patient-centered strategies for communication during audiology consultations are presented to build trust and positive therapeutic relationships.