ASHA Learning Pass

Visit the ASHA coronavirus resource pages to stay on top of all the latest resources and supports specific to issues related to COVID-19.

Filter Courses By
Experience
Instructional Level
Results 1 - 10 of 66
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 18) articles include topics on workload strategy for speech and language services in schools; vocal quality change during telepractice interactions and its potential impact on the services offered; a review of audiological interventions through telepractice; and the perspectives of clients who stutter who received treatment through telepractice
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 11) articles outlined how using real-time digital recordings of student sessions can support students' ability to self-evaluate, collect data, and prepare for therapy; provided data regarding the use of low-level vs. high-level questions with first- and final-year graduate students; and described a pilot project involving observation-based formative assessment tools for faculty use during clinical supervision.
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 11) articles outline the use of strategic questioning methods to stimulate students' critical thinking and other higher order thinking skills. In addition, the Code of Ethics is discussed as it relates to supervisory experiences across various settings.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 2) articles review and present current issues related to augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) across different patient populations, as well as identifies and discusses team-based interprofessional practice approaches for managing individuals with complex communication needs within both pediatric and adult populations. In the first article, Shannon Taylor, Sarah Jane Wallace, and Sarah Elizabeth Wallace explore factors that influence successful use of high-technology AAC in persons with poststroke aphasia via a literature review and narrative synthesis methodology. Lori Marra and Katie Micco present a clinical focus article that assesses communication partner’s perception regarding the effectiveness of a training model to support AAC use within a parent–adolescent communication pair. Michelle Westley, Dean Sutherland, and H. Timothy Bunnell examine the experience of healthy voice donors during the ModelTalker voice banking process for New Zealand-accent synthesized voices. Sarah Diehl and Michael de Reisthal describe the complex symptoms associated with Huntington’s disease and how they influence implementation of AAC to address the communication needs of this population. Kristen Abbott-Anderson, Hsinhuei Sheen Chiou, and Brooke N. Burk address interprofessional practice via a multidisciplinary patient-centered engagement experience entitled Spring EngAGEment that serves individuals living with Alzheimer’s disease or other associated dementias. Finally, Laura Hinkes Molinaro, and Wendy Stellpflug discuss a team approach for education and support of patients and families with postoperative pediatric cerebellar mutism syndrome.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 16) articles focus on ethical issues and describe considerations for the development of clinical skills in school-based settings. Readers will reflect upon and learn to resolve common ethical dilemmas, review a model of graduate mentoring from the lens of implementation science, and learn about commonly reported factors that both supervisors and graduate students believe critical within successful school-based internship experiences.
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 13) articles present clinicians with useful information to help assess and treat feeding and swallowing disorders in a variety of patient populations across the lifespan. Daniel Croake and Vrushali Angadi provide an overview of evidence regarding prophylactic and reactive gastrostomy tubes in individuals with head and neck cancer, to better facilitate joint decision-making of percutaneous gastrostomy (PEG) tube timing with the patient and care team. Hema Desai and Audrey Lim extend the discussion to pediatric dysphagia by summarizing the application of neurobehavioral interventions as part of feeding treatment for infants with congenital heart defects.
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 3) articles provide a comprehensive update on evaluation and management of unilateral vocal fold paralysis. Multidisciplinary evaluations are addressed in addition to various medical and behavioral treatment options.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: This Perspectives (SIG 1) forum focuses on supporting students in a school setting in improving morphological skills. Authors discuss key components of intervention, collaboration with other professionals, and practical strategies for clinicians.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 12) articles provide an introduction to and description of the rationale for implementation of augmentative alternative communication/assistive technology (AAC/AT) in acute care settings. Barriers associated with implementation of AAC/AT in acute care settings are identified and discussed. Data regarding use of the Noddle, a specific access and communication option, are presented and discussed. A series of case studies illustrate potential solutions to a wide range of both patient-specific and institutional implementation problems.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: First, Julie Case and Maria Grigos provide a review of speech motor control literature in childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) and give clinical implications to the assessment and treatment of CAS. Second, Kristen Allison reviews approaches to measuring speech intelligibility in children with motor speech disorders. Third, Tricia McCabe, Donna Thomas, and Elizabeth Murray describe Rapid Syllable Transition Treatment (ReST) as a treatment for CAS. Fourth, Nancy Tarshis, Michelle Winner, and Pamela Crooke explore how communication challenges in CAS impact social competency and how speech motor challenges impact social development. Finally, Nina Benway and Jonathan Preston evaluate if features of CAS in the literature could be replicated in a sample of school-age children. Readers will describe how speech motor skills have been found to change with practice in CAS, list the linguistic factors that can influence intelligibility, describe the quality of the research that supports ReST, explain ways to consider social cognition in therapy for CAS, and rank the speech features that distinguish the narrow phonetic transcriptions of children with CAS and speech sound disorders.
<< < 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 >>