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Results 1 - 10 of 63
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 11) articles outline the use of strategic questioning methods to stimulate students' critical thinking and other higher order thinking skills. In addition, the Code of Ethics is discussed as it relates to supervisory experiences across various settings.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 16) articles focus on ethical issues and describe considerations for the development of clinical skills in school-based settings. Readers will reflect upon and learn to resolve common ethical dilemmas, review a model of graduate mentoring from the lens of implementation science, and learn about commonly reported factors that both supervisors and graduate students believe critical within successful school-based internship experiences.
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 13) articles present clinicians with useful information to help assess and treat feeding and swallowing disorders in a variety of patient populations across the lifespan. Daniel Croake and Vrushali Angadi provide an overview of evidence regarding prophylactic and reactive gastrostomy tubes in individuals with head and neck cancer, to better facilitate joint decision-making of percutaneous gastrostomy (PEG) tube timing with the patient and care team. Hema Desai and Audrey Lim extend the discussion to pediatric dysphagia by summarizing the application of neurobehavioral interventions as part of feeding treatment for infants with congenital heart defects.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: This activity is a grouping of studies related to the understanding stuttering throughout the life span. The activity is based on articles related to attentional focus on motor control in people who stutter (PWS) and the relationship to social stress, acoustic measures of emotion in children who stutter, a study of covert stuttering throughout the lifespan, vocational stereotyping of PWS by human resource preprofessionals, and audio-based podcasts to assist in self-help for PWS. Together, these articles investigate important measures in understanding stuttering and how researchers and clinicians can better understand the condition of stuttering.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.55
Summary: Upon entering into a new school year, this SIG 16 Perspectives activity highlights some of the realities faced by school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and their students. Across all articles, readers will learn of the challenges that are all too often experienced by SLPs and our students, as well as recommendations for how to increase satisfaction with school-based positions, reduce burnout, and increase the mental health, representation, and motivation of our students. In the first article, the authors (Amir, Jones, Frankel, & Fritzch) report survey results that found that although school-based SLPs are satisfied with their relationships with students, they continue to experience challenges, especially related to caseload/workload and others’ misunderstanding of the roles and responsibilities of the SLP. This article is followed by a tutorial from Marante and Farquharson, in which they provide tips to address some of these challenges and reduce feelings of burnout and overwhelm, providing helpful checklists in the appendices. In the remaining three articles, authors outline ways for school-based SLPs to further support our students. The first of these articles, by Hoff and Unger, describes how to collaborate with mental health providers to address some of the unique social-emotional needs of students who stutter. Harris and Owen Van Horne, in the subsequent article, address how to include more diverse materials within therapy sessions so that the lived experiences of all students are more accurately portrayed and represented. Lastly, Abendroth and Whited discuss ways to support older students who are transitioning into adulthood, giving readers several ideas for how to increase students’ motivation, further develop rapport, and provide models of problem solving and resiliency.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: This Perspectives (SIG 1) forum focuses on developmental language disorder (DLD), including the history of terminology changes in the field, the relationship of specific language impairment and DLD, diagnostic criteria in the field of speech language pathology, and an examination of DLD through a school-based lens.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.25
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 13) include a variety of topics in dysphagia across the age continuum and across the many settings that speech-language pathologists (SLPs) address dysphagia. Parker Huston, Robert Dempster, and Lauren Garbacz provide readers with an overview of common evidence-based psychological techniques used in the treatment of adolescents with feeding disorders, including motivational interviewing and cognitive behavioral techniques. The goal of this paper is to provide a high-level overview of these concepts so that providers outside of psychology may utilize some of these techniques in therapy, when referral to a behavioral specialist or psychologist is not feasible. Next, authors Lauren Madhoun and Robert Dempster discuss the psychosocial aspects of feeding in the neonatal intensive care unit NICU and immediately following NICU discharge. Joanne Patterson extends the discussion to the adult population by describing a biopsychosocial intervention that combines cognitive behavioral with dysphagia therapy, termed Cognitive-Behavioral Enhanced Swallowing Therapy (CB-EST) and its application in managing head and neck cancer patients with dysphagia. Finally, authors Kortney Eng, Maria Jose Flores, Elisabeth Gerrity, Nupur Sinha, Katherine Imbeau, Laddie Erbele, and Cary Yeh share details from their study investigating the effect of high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) on swallow physiology in healthy adults. We hope these articles will be of significant value to practicing clinicians and to students learning about dysphagia.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: The assemblage of articles presents clinicians with information on a variety of topics in dysphagia that can be utilized in practice. Laura L. Madhoun, Laura C. Merrell, Amanda Smith, Emily Snow, and Kristen M. Cherosky stress the importance of individualized and comprehensive feeding management for craniofacial anomalies through interdisciplinary collaboration. Lena G. Caesar and Meretu Kitila study clinicians’ perceptions and confidence with dysphagia service delivery. Aliaa Sabry, Amanda S. Mahoney, Shitong Mao, Yassin Khalifa, Ervin Sejdić, and James L. Coyle point out an objective way to assess laryngeal vestibule closure and opening at beside. Marie Jardine, Anna Miles, Jacqui Allen, and Rebecca Leonard give an interesting take of assessment of the aging swallow. Kelsey L. Thompson and Wanqing Zhang provide description and examples of mixed method research to comprehensively and holistically report of pediatric feeding disorders.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: First, Julie Case and Maria Grigos provide a review of speech motor control literature in childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) and give clinical implications to the assessment and treatment of CAS. Second, Kristen Allison reviews approaches to measuring speech intelligibility in children with motor speech disorders. Third, Tricia McCabe, Donna Thomas, and Elizabeth Murray describe Rapid Syllable Transition Treatment (ReST) as a treatment for CAS. Fourth, Nancy Tarshis, Michelle Winner, and Pamela Crooke explore how communication challenges in CAS impact social competency and how speech motor challenges impact social development. Finally, Nina Benway and Jonathan Preston evaluate if features of CAS in the literature could be replicated in a sample of school-age children. Readers will describe how speech motor skills have been found to change with practice in CAS, list the linguistic factors that can influence intelligibility, describe the quality of the research that supports ReST, explain ways to consider social cognition in therapy for CAS, and rank the speech features that distinguish the narrow phonetic transcriptions of children with CAS and speech sound disorders.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 13) presents clinicians with information across many aspects of feeding and swallowing. Firstly Kendrea Garand, Taylor Thomas, and Rajarshi Dey discuss the physiology of laterality in the clearance of boluses from the pharynx. Next, Jennifer Wilson, Amanda Simmons, and Jillian McCarthy then take us through an interesting description of speech-language pathologists’ experiences and education in pediatric dysphagia and encourage the incorporation of intensive education in this high-risk topic, via various avenues. In the final three articles, Pamela Smith, Jinxu Bridget Xia, and Claire Radford et al., present an in-depth and elaborate perspective on managing patients with dysphagia through a palliative care lens, across the lifespan.
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