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Presenter(s): Kathleen M. Cienkowski, PhD, CCC-A
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: There has been a renewed interest in the provision of aural rehabilitation (AR) services as part of patient-centered hearing health care. Aural rehabilitation is a holistic approach to the management of hearing loss that may include patient education, fitting of devices, and auditory training exercises. Although audiologists may recognize the benefits of comprehensive AR, questions may remain about how to measure functional outcomes of these services. This course reviews functional outcome assessments for aural rehabilitation and how to incorporate these measures into everyday practice to enhance patient success.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: This journal self-study includes select papers on conversation and discourse production that were presented at the 49th Clinical Aphasiology Conference (2019) in Whitefish, Montana. The articles reflect the current state of research on treatments to improve conversation and discourse production for people with aphasia.
Presenter(s): Gayla L. Poling, PhD, CCC-A
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: Hundreds of medications commonly prescribed for anticancer treatments and some infections are known to cause auditory and/or vestibular dysfunction, known as ototoxicity. This course discusses early detection of ototoxicity through increased awareness, leveraging current tools, and clinical practice approaches for serial monitoring, all of which can provide care teams opportunities to identify adverse effects, modify treatment plans to mitigate hearing loss, and utilize individualized interventions. The speaker discusses strategies for preventing or minimizing cochlear damage to preserve quality of life for patients receiving treatment and to reduce the societal burden of hearing loss.
Presenter(s): Dr. O’neil W. Guthrie, MS, PhD, CCC-A
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: Gene therapy offers the promise to correct inherited forms of hearing loss as well as acquired forms such as noise-induced hearing loss, ototoxicity, and presbycusis. However, there are several barriers that must be overcome before such potential can be realized. This course describes the conceptual framework that governs gene therapy today, reveals how this framework has influenced current progress, and discusses a re-imagining of inner ear gene therapy with the goal of achieving outcomes that are clinically relevant and realistic.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.25
Summary: These SIG 8 Perspectives articles focus on topics that are important in promoting public health audiology. In “Fundamentals of Epidemiology for the Audiologist,” Torre and Reavis provide an overview of basic epidemiologic concepts including study design, prevalence, incidence, risk ratios, and odds ratios. The authors emphasize that an understanding of epidemiology is crucial for audiologists for a variety of reasons, including to help them assess the quality of publications, evaluate and discuss the efficacy of screening methods, and evaluate and communicate risk factors for ear and hearing problems. In “Hearing Health Care Delivery Outside the Booth,” Gates, Hecht, Grantham, Fallon, and Martukovich review the literature on boothless audiometry and introduce current tools used to deliver hearing health care outside of the traditional clinic setting. From their review, the authors conclude that boothless audiometry technology provides an opportunity for audiologists to expand services to nontraditional settings such as waiting grooms and nursing homes, increasing access to care, early identification, and intervention, and therefore improving health outcomes.
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: How can audiologists enhance patient-centered communication, even during the COVID-19 pandemic? This self-study is from the journal, Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, SIG 7: Auditory Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation. It features two articles focused on patient-centered strategies for effective communication, from initial consultations to prioritizing follow-up care, during COVID-19. It also includes the article that won the 2021 ASHA Journals Editor’s Award for Perspectives (for SIGs 6, 7, 8, and 9) by Davidson and Marrone. The first article is, “How to Provide Accessible Hearing Health Information to Promote Patient-Centered Care.” Kelly-Campbell and Manchaiah review the literature within audiology on patient-provider communication. They focus on research studies of communication during initial audiology consultation sessions. Through a summary of themes in the literature, they categorize important research findings that provide insight into communication between patients and their audiologists. Finally, they identify five key strategies for effective patient-centered communication. Each strategy is then reviewed in detail, with clinical examples and specific recommendations that can be immediately implemented in practice. The second article is, “A Clinically Valuable Interaction in the Midst of COVID-19 and Beyond: A Viewpoint on the Importance of Patient-Centered Outcomes in Rehabilitative Audiology.” Davidson and Marrone discuss patient-centered communication following hearing aid device fittings. They identify challenges facing patients and audiologists related to follow-up hearing aid services as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Based on a literature review and their own recent research, they developed a decision-tree algorithm to help audiologists prioritize clinical activities following hearing aid fittings, including remote formats for care. The algorithm was based on use of a patient-centered outcome measure, the Measure of Audiologic Rehabilitation Self-Efficacy. Patient-centered outcomes measurement is suggested as an engagement strategy for continued communication with patients during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.
Presenter(s): Vickie L. Tuten, AuD, CCC-A, CPS/A; Kathy E. Gates, AuD, CCC-A
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: Noise is prevalent in everyday life, and the general population lacks awareness of the risks of hazardous noise exposure and strategies to reduce noise-induced hearing loss. By integrating hearing loss prevention education into patient encounters and taking advantage of outreach/education opportunities, audiologists can help reduce the prevalence of noise-induced hearing loss. This course discusses the why, where, and how of integrating prevention education into your practice.
Presenter(s): Lauren Calandruccio, PhD, CCC-A
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: The likelihood of encountering multilingual individuals, non-English-speaking individuals, and non-native speakers of English in the clinic is becoming more common. As audiologists are working with linguistically diverse populations, they may find themselves asking, “How should I evaluate speech perception in my patients who are not monolingual speakers of English? Which speech materials should I use?” This on demand webinar reviews the current literature on multilingual and non-native speech perception and discusses approaches to best serve patients from diverse linguistic backgrounds.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: This activity includes two articles related to language and literacy intervention for children with hearing loss and deafness. In the first article, Stephanie Mary Raymond and Tring D. Spencer investigate the effect of narrative language intervention on the narrative retelling skills and vocabulary use of children with hearing loss. In the second article, Krystal L. Werfel and Sarah Lawrence describe specific considerations for print-referencing interventions for children with hearing loss along with a case study. The respective authors conclude that print referencing, with specific considerations for children with hearing loss, may be an effective emergent literacy intervention to increase conceptual print knowledge for children preschool-age with hearing loss; and narrative intervention is promising for facilitating language skills improvement for children with hearing loss. Both studies require replication for their findings.
Presenter(s): Brooke Lang, MA, CCC-SLP; Kyle Mamiya, MS, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: SLPs across work settings face challenges associated with adapting their current evaluation and treatment methods to telepractice. This on demand webinar will discuss adaptations and evidence-based practices for using telepractice to effectively assess and treat individuals with neurogenic communication disorders.
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