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Presenter(s): Megan-Brette Hamilton, PhD, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: Many clinicians may feel they lack the time, skills, or competence to effectively address diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI); it might feel like one more thing on an already-long list of considerations and requirements. But if we focus on our passion for working with people and change our perspective about providing culturally responsive services, then it's not more work, it is the work. This course discusses the value of addressing DEI as part of audiology and SLP services and provides practical ideas for doing so.
Presenter(s): Nicole Cruse, PhD; Nicholas Behn; Victor Piotto; Carl A Coelho, PhD, BC-ANCDS
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: This session discusses a study that examined the feasibility of telehealth administration of narrative and procedural discourse tasks to individuals with TBI and matched controls. Results support the feasibility of collecting discourse samples via telehealth. Although the participants' discourse performance distinguished the TBI and control groups on the narrative task, no differences between the groups were noted for the procedural task.
Presenter(s): Mark A. Parker, PhD, CCC-A, F-AAA
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: The audiogram is a poor representation of a person's underlying otopathology and can therefore be a poor predictor of a person's hearing impairment. For example, persons with audiometric thresholds within normal limits may experience hearing impairment such as difficulty hearing in noise. Cochlear synaptopathy and outer hair cell dysfunction are two otopathologies undetected by the standard audiogram (a.k.a. Hidden Hearing Loss), but outer hair cell function plays a primary role in hearing in noise performance. A third undetected otopathology is cochlear untuning, which occurs secondary to outer hair cell damage. This course discusses each of these otopathologies and presents clinical normative data that can be used to differentially diagnose each otopathology.
Presenter(s): Danielle M Connor, MS, CCC-SLP; Annie Govea, MS, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, access to our patients for in-person treatment may be limited and our ability to develop a relationship with patients/caregivers may have taken a toll due to facility protocols to protect against the spread of infection. As health care providers, we must reflect on our abilities to communicate with patients and their families, ensuring understanding of their deficits and treatment options even as we continue through a pandemic. This course provides the clinician with a review of holistic assessments and health literacy approaches that will empower the patient to make informed decisions. This course is a recorded session from the 2021 ASHA Convention Virtual Library (session 2140V).
Presenter(s): Kyomi Dana Gregory-Martin, PhD, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: When evaluating and treating a client, patient, or student for any type of disorder, audiologists and SLPs need to consider the individual's culture, including the language and dialect they speak. This on demand webinar discusses the acronym MIND (Minority Indigenous Nonstandardized Dialects) and explores the social stigma and unfair treatment individuals often experience due to their language or dialect (known as linguicism).
Presenter(s): Julie A G Stierwalt, PhD, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: Principles of motor learning (PML) are guidelines developed for the purpose of training motor execution of movement. Initially designed for training in the limbs, the methods have been adapted for use with the oral motor system. This course reviews how PML can be employed in training protocols targeting speech production.
Presenter(s): Alicia B Hamilton, MS, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: Cultural competence can be defined as the knowledge and skills a provider requires in order to meet the social, cultural, and linguistic needs of clients, patients, and/or students while providing impactful services. This micro course explores questions like, "What are ways I can obtain information about the cultural traditions, preferences, and experiences of a client, patient, or student?" and "How can I partner with them to gain this essential information?"
Presenter(s): Alicia B Hamilton, MS, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: Cultural humility involves orienting yourself to the cultural aspects that are most important to your client, patient, or student. It embodies an attitude of partnership that fosters curiosity and respect for the individual's cultural practices and preferences while acknowledging areas where the clinician may lack knowledge. This micro course explores questions like, "How might my personal cultural practices impact my interactions?" and "How can I develop and hone skills to recognize these situations?"
Presenter(s): Alicia B Hamilton, MS, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: Cultural responsiveness is an approach that uses both cultural knowledge/competence and cultural humility to honor a client's culture across all aspects of their treatment and learning. Cultural responsiveness is a fluid approach and requires partnership with a client as well as self-reflection. This micro course explores questions related to cultural responsiveness, like, "What does a culturally responsive interaction look and feel like?" and "How might one situation elicit many different reactions or perceptions?"
Presenter(s): Alicia B Hamilton, MS, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: A culturally responsive professional uses tools and resources to enhance their cultural competence (knowledge), develop their cultural humility to strengthen client relationships, and create interactions that value and honor the individual culture of the client, patient, or student, while working together to reach the individual's goals. This micro course explores questions related to cultural responsiveness, like, "How can I create a practice of self-reflection to enhance my interactions?" and "What are resources I can turn to when I want to develop my competence?"
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