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Presenter(s): Jennifer A Drob, AuD, CCC-A
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: As bone conduction implants evolve, there are now more options available than ever before, prompting the question: How do I choose the right one for my patients? This recorded session from the ASHA Audiology 2022 Online Conference discusses the current bone conduction implants on the market, candidacy criteria, and programming considerations.
Presenter(s): Ivette Cejas, PhD
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: This course examines the social and emotional needs of families and how professionals can effectively support clients and their families across the life span for greater well-being. Building on prior experience, knowledge, and skill within the area of auditory rehabilitation, the session focuses on clinical tools and techniques in areas including screening for depression and anxiety, techniques for parental involvement, and counseling skills in motivational interviewing.
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: The article in this SIG 6 activity focuses on the audiologic variations seen among patients undergoing the same type of ototoxic drug treatment (cisplatin). Results show a large amount of audiologic outcome variability among the two patients examined, despite similar demographic factors, drug treatments, and types of cancer. Factors relating to ototoxic susceptibility are discussed, and the importance of otoxicity monitoring programs for early detection of audiologic change is highlighted.
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.15
Summary: These SIG 7 Perspectives articles focus on auditory rehabilitation (AR) for adults with cochlear implants. While the benefits of AR in the population are recognized in the literature, service-delivery models are variable, and there is no gold standard approach to developing and implementing a comprehensive AR program. Glade and colleagues provide an overview of clinical models currently being used for the provision of AR for adults with cochlear implants from nine clinics across the country. The article highlights the importance of interprofessional practice in AR and outlines the roles of professionals included on care teams. There is a discussion about barriers to successful implementation of AR programs, including distance to services, and recommendations for potential solutions, such as teletherapy. In the second article, Mosley describes the process of creating and implementing a comprehensive teleaudiology AR program for older adults who use cochlear implants at the University of South Alabama Speech & Hearing Center.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: The first article in this SIG 18 activity investigates the applications speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and audiologists used most frequently during the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. It also discusses the main obstacles to providing speech, language, and hearing services through telepractice. Through the international distribution of an electronic survey, a total of 1,466 surveys from SLPs and audiologists from 40 countries were used for the analysis. The second article discusses the Auditory Verbal UK's training program for prospective listening and spoken language specialist certified auditory verbal therapists delivered globally via telepractice. The article explores, from a global perspective, audiology and early intervention services and perspectives regarding telepractice. The third article explores parents' and therapists' views of the benefits and challenges of telepractice for early intervention for children who are deaf or hard of hearing during the COVID-19 pandemic. Through survey and analysis, the article probes the views of parents, Listening and Spoken Language Specialist Certified Auditory Verbal Therapists in using telepractice to deliver auditory verbal sessions.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: This trio of SIG 9 articles provides the reader with three diversely focused topics related to pediatric hearing and hearing disorders. These range from a review of barriers to equity in pediatric hearing health care, to students’ perspectives on preservice education about cued speech, and then how practitioners measure receptive and expressive American Sign Language (ASL). The review, “Barriers to Equity in Pediatric Hearing Health Care: A Review of the Evidence,” explores data to suggest that hearing health care disparities constitute a major factor in loss to follow-up or documentation for children going through the Early Hearing Detection and Intervention process. Underlying disparities are multifactorial and result in delayed care and suboptimal developmental outcomes for children who are deaf or hard of hearing. “ASL Assessment in Practice: Assessing American Sign Language Across Clinical Settings” discusses exploratory research to investigate what assessment tools professionals use in measuring receptive and expressive ASL. Conclusions indicate that there is variable access and knowledge for appropriate assessment measures in ASL. “The Effect of a Graduate Course in Cued Speech on Students' Perspectives: A Pilot Study” is a pilot study investigating the beliefs and attitudes in Deaf Education related to a course on cued speech. The investigation revealed that a single course in the approach could influence student perspectives on cued speech and other Deaf Education instructional approaches.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.25
Summary: In “Coupling Hearing Health With Community-Based Group Therapy for Cognitive Health in Low-Income African American Elders,” Postman et al. describe a community-based group intervention to address disparities experienced by African American elders in the early stages of cognitive–communicative decline. The intervention included partnerships with community health centers, culturally informed activities, and ongoing input from staff and participants. The authors describe the advantages of this community-engaged approach, as well as the benefits of joining hearing and cognition for minimizing access barriers. In “Public Health Frameworks in Audiology Education: Rationale and Model for Implementation,” Warren and Levy review how public health education can advance the field of audiology, particularly through coursework and dual degree programs. The authors also describe two frameworks for public health training in an audiology academic setting and identify the competencies that overlap in audiology and public health, helping to illustrate the relevance of public health education in addressing objectives in hearing health care.
Presenter(s): De Wet Swanepoel; Karina De Sousa
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: This course discusses validated technologies for remote hearing screening in the digital age, including options for no-touch screening with uncalibrated equipment and low-touch remote screening. The course is part of a set of practical programs that address specific aspects of remote practice in audiology.
Presenter(s): Mary Elliott; Andrea D Warner-Czyz; Rachel E. Glade; Nannette Nicholson
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: This course focuses on social-emotional learning milestones and current trends in research regarding social-emotional learning for children who are deaf or hard of hearing relative to peers with typical hearing. A research team reports on findings from a survey of caregivers of children with hearing loss regarding their knowledge, ratings, and facilitation of social-emotional learning in their children.
Presenter(s): Soumya Venkitakrishnan; Yu-Hsiang Wu; Nicholas P Giuliani
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: Individuals with hearing loss experience negative psychosocial consequences such as distress, depression, and loneliness. If they also experience excessive negative emotional responses (i.e., confusion, frustration, anger) or reduced positive emotional responses (i.e., happiness) compared to listeners with normal hearing, they might be unmotivated to approach communication situations. This course describes a study whose purpose was to determine the feasibility of using facial expressions to measure emotional responses.
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