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Presenter(s): Tammy Hopper, PhD, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: This on demand webinar presents research evidence and practical examples to help SLPs design person-centered, evidence-based group treatments for individuals with mild to moderate dementia.
Presenter(s): Michelle Tristani, MS, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This session identifies challenges associated with assessing patients with the dual diagnosis of dysphagia and dementia and describes how clinicians can be empowered to use a comprehensive, systematic clinical pathway to create an intervention plan that preserves safety, nutrition, hydration, and quality of life. This course is a recorded session from the 2017 online conference “Dysphagia in Older Adults.”
Presenter(s): Tammy Hopper, PhD, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This video course will help SLPs choose the best evidence-based interventions to target cognitive and communication disorders for individual clients at different stages of dementia. The speaker will discuss methods of measuring outcomes as well as case study examples.
Presenter(s): Tammy Hopper, PhD, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: When an SLP first meets an older adult with dementia and a cognitive-communication disorder, many questions arise. What is the nature of the person’s communication problems? What are the causes and contributors to the problems? How are the problems affecting the person’s ability to participate in everyday life activities? What is the most effective, evidence-based, and person-centered approach to answering these questions? This video course will discuss cognitive-communication disorders related to dementia and provide ideas to help SLPs select the most appropriate screening or assessment for individual clients.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: Clinicians who work with individuals with dementia are well aware of the need to address memory and other cognitive issues. However, there are other potential problems that may co-occur with dementia or happen as a result of the disease progression. This journal self-study explores some of these issues, including ways to improve the use of compensatory swallowing strategies, the impact of hearing amplification on cognitive performance, how motor speech may be affected by dementia and other progressive disorders, and how auditory processing may be affected by cognitive impairment. Clinicians can use this information to improve how they manage patients with dementia.