ASHA Learning Pass

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Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: This Perspectives (SIG 1) forum focuses on developmental language disorder (DLD), including the history of terminology changes in the field, the relationship of specific language impairment and DLD, diagnostic criteria in the field of speech language pathology, and an examination of DLD through a school-based lens.
Credit(s): PDHs: 6.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.65
Summary: This Perspectives activity focuses on the assessment and treatment of school-age students with social language deficits. Articles focus on conversational profiles for students with autism and intervention strategies appropriate for students within each profile; the benefit of using analog tasks with toddlers through adolescents to evaluate social communication abilities and guide intervention; best practices in assessing students with social communication deficits; and how effective commercially available standardized tests are for evaluating the social and pragmatic language deficits of students with social pragmatic communication disorder within and separate from autism.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: This activity focuses on the childhood maltreatment consequences on social pragmatic communication. Based on a complex family and social conception of neglect, a logical model illustrating public health services for children experiencing neglect is proposed. The role of speech-language pathology in prevention, policy, and practice is outlined. The importance of assessing the narrative language of children exposed to complex trauma is also emphasized.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: This Perspectives (SIG 1) forum focuses on the treatment of young children with a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder. The first article examines the effects of parent-mediated intervention on the spoken language of young children. The second article focuses on an embedded teacher-implemented social communication intervention for preschoolers. The third article examined peer mediated augmentative and alternative communication for young minimally verbal children. The final article reported on social communication predictors of successful inclusion experiences for students with autism in an early childhood lab school.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: For people experiencing dizziness, what are possible options for vestibular and balance rehabilitation? This self-study from Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups (SIG 7) addresses treatment choices in vestibular and balance rehabilitation, the state of the evidence on their efficacy, and future directions for interdisciplinary research and practice. Written by clinicians and scholars with expertise in audiology and physical therapy, the four articles present an interdisciplinary and life span approach to vestibular and balance rehabilitation for children and adults. The first article by Christy is on the use of vestibular and balance rehabilitation therapy for dizziness in children. Next, the review by Herdman focuses on the evolution of vestibular function tests and rehabilitation for major vestibular disorders as well as areas in which research and clinical practice may grow in the future. In Holmberg, the relatively new but common diagnosis of persistent postural-perceptual dizziness (PPPD) is presented in terms of its pathophysiology, differential diagnosis, and treatment protocols. Finally, Clendaniel provides a review on the use of vestibular rehabilitation in the treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Included are detailed photos and illustrations of current techniques and exercises. As described in the introduction to the forum by Guest Editor Neil Shepard, PhD, “It is hoped that these four articles will provide a needed look at vestibular and balance rehabilitation therapy (VBRT) so the audiologist can serve as a productive member of the treatment team and have a good understanding as to everything that
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: This Perspectives forum focuses on the reading outcomes of students with hearing loss and cochlear implants. The first article examines the role of vocabulary on print knowledge for students with hearing loss. The second article provides recommendations for treating the listening and spoken language skills of students with hearing loss based on the results of a 2-year study. The third article compares how reading ability and working memory are impacted in students with cochlear implants and hearing aids after they participated in a computer-based program. The final article explores the relationship between language and reading ability in students with hearing impairment.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.55
Summary: This Perspectives activity focuses on communication choice and agency for individuals on the autism spectrum. These individuals are the key informants in decisions around the conceptualization, implementation, and evaluation of educational programming for autistic learners. Speaking autistic adults encourage families, professionals, and society to promote and accept all communication as equal.
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: How can audiologists enhance patient-centered communication, even during the COVID-19 pandemic? This self-study is from the journal, Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, SIG 7: Auditory Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation. It features two articles focused on patient-centered strategies for effective communication, from initial consultations to prioritizing follow-up care, during COVID-19. It also includes the article that won the 2021 ASHA Journals Editor’s Award for Perspectives (for SIGs 6, 7, 8, and 9) by Davidson and Marrone. The first article is, “How to Provide Accessible Hearing Health Information to Promote Patient-Centered Care.” Kelly-Campbell and Manchaiah review the literature within audiology on patient-provider communication. They focus on research studies of communication during initial audiology consultation sessions. Through a summary of themes in the literature, they categorize important research findings that provide insight into communication between patients and their audiologists. Finally, they identify five key strategies for effective patient-centered communication. Each strategy is then reviewed in detail, with clinical examples and specific recommendations that can be immediately implemented in practice. The second article is, “A Clinically Valuable Interaction in the Midst of COVID-19 and Beyond: A Viewpoint on the Importance of Patient-Centered Outcomes in Rehabilitative Audiology.” Davidson and Marrone discuss patient-centered communication following hearing aid device fittings. They identify challenges facing patients and audiologists related to follow-up hearing aid services as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Based on a literature review and their own recent research, they developed a decision-tree algorithm to help audiologists prioritize clinical activities following hearing aid fittings, including remote formats for care. The algorithm was based on use of a patient-centered outcome measure, the Measure of Audiologic Rehabilitation Self-Efficacy. Patient-centered outcomes measurement is suggested as an engagement strategy for continued communication with patients during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.