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Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 10) articles explore several issues related to student success. Sylvan, Brock, Perkins, and Garret examine prerequisites required by graduate programs in speech-language pathology across the United States. Roitsch, Murphy, and Raymer investigate the relationship between executive functions and academic outcomes in speech-language pathology graduate students. Richardson, Roberts, and Victor explore ways to predict the clinical success of graduate students studying speechlanguage pathology. Look, Shoemaker, Hoepner, and Blake discover benefits of engaging undergraduate students in research.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: In these Perspectives (SIG 10) Roos and Schreck examine the stress experienced by undergraduate students in communication sciences and disorders (CSD), including stress levels, reasons for stress, stress management, and knowledge/use of campus resources to address stress. Shah and Galantino address building the emotional intelligence of undergraduate students studying CSD through exercises completed in class. Sylvan, Perkins, and Tuglio study the experiences and perceptions of CSD students applying to master’s degree programs, including deciding factors for top choices of graduate programs, emotional involvement in the application process, biases/rumors heard, student challenges, advice to future applicants, and what students would change about the application process. Finally, Crais and Savage present an examination of CSD graduates’ perceptions of their PhD program, including challenges they faced, facilitators for success, their preparation for research/teaching/job readiness, and ways PhD education might be improved.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 8) articles cover a wide range of audiology and public health research and clinical topics. There are three original research reports and one clinical review. In the first research report, Roman et al. examine the impact of reduced audibility and speaker voice on the mini-mental state examination score in a group of young adults without cognitive impairment. Next, Beamer et al. conduct a preliminary study to investigate the role of a hearing loss prevention education strategies in an active duty military population. Reavis et al. estimate the association between tinnitus and self-reported depression symptoms and between tinnitus and perceived anxiety in a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults. The final article by Henry and Manning is a review article on sound therapy approaches and clinical options for tinnitus management.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: In this activity, four recent SIG 10 articles are presented. First, Domsch, Stiritz, and Huff utilized a mixed-methods design to examine the cultural awareness of students in communication sciences and disorders (CSD) during and after a study-abroad experience. Next, Franca, Boyer, and Pegoraro-Krook explored activities designed to promote cultural and clinical competence in a collaboration between CSD programs in the United States and Brazil. Then, Veyvoda and Van Cleave reviewed the literature on service-learning and community-engaged learning, described how these approaches could be used in distance-learning modalities, and explored how doing so could be accomplished during and after the COVID-19 pandemic. Finally, Towson et al. studied the effectiveness of coaching paired with the use of a mixed-reality simulator as CSD students practiced interprofessional communication skills in role-play scenarios.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.25
Summary: These SIG 8 Perspectives articles focus on topics that are important in promoting public health audiology. In “Fundamentals of Epidemiology for the Audiologist,” Torre and Reavis provide an overview of basic epidemiologic concepts including study design, prevalence, incidence, risk ratios, and odds ratios. The authors emphasize that an understanding of epidemiology is crucial for audiologists for a variety of reasons, including to help them assess the quality of publications, evaluate and discuss the efficacy of screening methods, and evaluate and communicate risk factors for ear and hearing problems. In “Hearing Health Care Delivery Outside the Booth,” Gates, Hecht, Grantham, Fallon, and Martukovich review the literature on boothless audiometry and introduce current tools used to deliver hearing health care outside of the traditional clinic setting. From their review, the authors conclude that boothless audiometry technology provides an opportunity for audiologists to expand services to nontraditional settings such as waiting grooms and nursing homes, increasing access to care, early identification, and intervention, and therefore improving health outcomes.