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Presenter(s): A Collaborative Project of ASHA Professional Development and SIG 13, Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia)
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: Speech-language pathologists working in health care are faced with many challenges, including an ever-changing reimbursement and regulatory landscape and varied patient population. These challenges require ongoing education and training, as well as knowledge of evidence-based practices and appropriate roles and responsibilities. This self-study addresses issues that SLPs working with dysphagia need to consider so that they can help their patients achieve the best possible clinical outcomes. The course begins with a discussion of the role of the SLP in addressing cough and then delves into a further discussion of sensory processing and how that may affect swallowing. It continues with a detailed description of issues the SLP must consider in long-term care settings and when providing palliative care. SLPs working with individuals with dysphagia can use this information to improve services and advocate for their role in the challenging health care environment.
Credit(s): PDHs: 6.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.6
Summary: A 2019 Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools forum, Vocabulary Across the School Grades, presented evidence that strong vocabulary is important for students’ literacy and overall academic success across grade levels. The articles in this journal self-study course describe effective instructional strategies for facilitating vocabulary growth and improving reading comprehension in middle and high school students. The authors present recommendations and implications for practice.
Credit(s): PDHs: 6.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.65
Summary: As a result of recent laws and regulations, more SLPs in schools are treating children with dyslexia. The journal articles in this self-study – from an October 2018 Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools clinical forum on dyslexia – provide “state-of-the-science” information to help SLPs understand dyslexia in relation to other speech and language disorders, as well as ways to identify, assess, and treat this disorder. Clinicians will find practical tips that they can immediately incorporate into practice.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 11) articles outlined how using real-time digital recordings of student sessions can support students' ability to self-evaluate, collect data, and prepare for therapy; provided data regarding the use of low-level vs. high-level questions with first- and final-year graduate students; and described a pilot project involving observation-based formative assessment tools for faculty use during clinical supervision.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.55
Summary: Technology has irrefutably expanded the availability of speech and language services to populations that are more difficult to serve due to mobility challenges and/or remote locations. The articles in this journal self-study illustrate how telepractice – including mixed-service delivery models that incorporate both clinic and telepractice components –can enhance telehabilitation and telerehabilitation practices across a range of communication disorders.
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 11) articles outline the use of strategic questioning methods to stimulate students' critical thinking and other higher order thinking skills. In addition, the Code of Ethics is discussed as it relates to supervisory experiences across various settings.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: While the definition of executive function (EF) varies in the literature, it includes, at its core, the skills people use to plan, organize, problem-solve, and set and achieve goals in their daily lives. EF skills start developing in early childhood, and children with EF dysfunction experience social and academic difficulties. This journal self-study explores issues related to the development of EF skills as well as principles and practical strategies for EF assessment and intervention in preschool and school-age children. It also presents an argument for the role of EF in social communication and discusses ways that SLPs can address these skills in treatment. SLPs working with children with EF deficits can use this information to improve assessment techniques and plan intervention strategies to better meet the needs of these children.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.55
Summary: English grammar develops in a fairly predictable sequence, and errors are common as children learn grammar rules. Children with language impairments often demonstrate continued difficulty with grammatical morphemes. This journal self-study explores issues related to grammar development, as well as factors to consider when assessing and treating grammar deficits. Clinicians can use this information to improve intervention and optimize grammar development in children with language disorders.
Credit(s): PDHs: 7.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.7
Summary: Taking into account children’s learning processes is important when SLPs design interventions aimed at teaching new skills or expanding abilities. This journal self-study – based on a special issue of Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools – focuses on the type of learning that happens implicitly and quickly, without effort or even the knowledge that we are learning. This type of learning – known as statistical learning – refers to the way that children recognize patterns in the world around them. As language is full of patterns, this type of learning plays a large role in how children learn sound production, words, grammatical structures, and more. The articles in this selfstudy explore how SLPs can capitalize on implicit learning processes during intervention to help learning happen faster.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: A communication disorder can have a profound impact on many aspects of a person’s life, including school, work, leisure, and social relationships. Sudden changes, such as those that occur after stroke or other illness, as well as more gradual difficulties, such as those associated with age-related hearing loss, can negatively affect interactions with other people and engagement in daily activities. This journal self-study explores how social networks and feelings of isolation or loneliness may change when a person experiences communication difficulties. It also looks at how well SLPs and audiologists recognize and address the social and emotional needs of their patients during treatment. Clinicians working with older adults with speech, language, and hearing disorders will come away with a better understanding of the impact of social and familial support on patient success and how to better address these needs when planning treatment.
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