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Results 61 - 64 of 64
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: Distinguishing between language disorder and language difference can be a challenge when a child speaks a nonmainstream English dialect. This journal self-study presents research findings that clinicians can implement with this population in their practice. Two of the articles examine modifications to scoring procedures to correct for dialect in assessments for language impairment. The third article explores the validity of a dialect-sensitive assessment tool. The final article examines the effects of a curriculum designed to teach dialectal differences. In total, the assessment and intervention strategies and tools discussed in these articles will allow SLPs to deliver more effective services and promote academic success for children who speak nonmainstream English dialects.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: A child’s early language development can be used to predict later language and literacy skills, as well as school readiness and academic success. It has long been a challenge to distinguish children who are “late talkers” and will eventually develop age-appropriate language skills from those who might have a language delay that requires intervention. This journal self-study primarily examines issues related to assessing language disorders in preschoolers, in an attempt to identify those children who may be at risk for language and learning difficulties and would benefit from support. Specifically, articles examine risk factors for being a late talker, alternative methods of screening for language impairment, and the usefulness of parent and teacher reports when screening bilingual children. One final article discusses collecting and reporting outcomes for preschool children with speech and language disorders. Clinicians can use this information to improve their approach to language screening and outcomes reporting for preschoolers on their caseload.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: A significant proportion of treatment research aims to determine whether particular interventions are effective in addressing children’s language deficits, but just as important are ways to increase efficiency of these interventions in practice. The articles in this journal self-study examine a range of variables that promote efficiency. The first article manipulates two parameters of dosage—rate and distribution of teaching episodes—and compares the effects on vocabulary learning in preschoolers with autism spectrum disorder. The second article examines the dosage parameter of schedule (massed or distributed) on an intervention targeting grammatical morphemes in preschoolers with specific language impairment (SLI). The third article examines adequate intensity for vocabulary acquisition for children with SLI during interactive book reading. A final article demonstrates how the addition of one training component in early educator professional development leads to greater efficiency in children’s responses to the same intervention presented in the third article.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: This journal self-study course explores some considerations that SLPs who work with specialized patient populations in various health care settings face in dysphagia management. Articles discuss instituting dysphagia exercise programs for patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; the injury process and acute care management of individuals with dysphagia due to chemical ingestion; and preliminary evidence concerning new speaking valve technology for patients living with tracheostomy. The final article evaluates from a legal perspective the common practice of encouraging patients who decline dietary restrictions to sign waivers of liability.
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