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Results 31 - 38 of 38
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: Clinicians who work with children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are aware of the challenges presented by the varied abilities and behaviors of this group. This journal self-study focuses on special populations of children with ASD, including those who are deaf, those who use AAC, and bilingual children. A final article discusses how intervention can be extended beyond improving social skills to working toward establishing and maintaining actual friendships. SLPs working with children with ASD can use information from these articles to improve clinical practice when working with children with these particular special situations.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.55
Summary: Literacy skills begin to develop in early childhood, and addressing deficits in reading and writing skills early may prevent later problems in school. This journal self-study explores special situations that may affect literacy skills, including the presence of speech sound disorders, hearing impairment, and cultural and/or socioeconomic differences. It also includes articles that discuss intervention techniques to improve phonological awareness, an important emergent literacy skill. Clinicians can use this information to improve reading and writing assessment and treatment techniques for preschool and early elementary school children.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: The articles included in this journal self-study include evidence-based assessment and intervention practices for children with cleft lip and/or palate, a specialized population with which many SLPs have limited experience. The first article describes a clinical measure for quantifying nasal air emission using a nasal accelerometer. The second article illustrates the developmental timeline of typical velopharyngeal function in speech production and then compares it to what is seen in toddlers with repaired cleft. The third article offers treatment efficacy data for a naturalistic intervention with phonological emphasis for toddlers with cleft lip and/or palate. The final article examines a number of factors that can influence language development in internationally adopted children with cleft lip and/or palate.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: This journal self-study explores a variety of issues related to adult vocal health and how voice disorders affect social and work-related interactions. Articles examine prevalence rates of voice disorders among college students; self-reports of vocal use; issues that school workers confront that may affect vocal health; the impact of common workplace issues, such as heating and air conditioning levels, on vocal functioning; and how voice disorders may affect listener processing and comprehension.
Credit(s): PDHs: 6.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.6
Summary: Children with speech sound disorders make up a large part of the caseload for many SLPs who work with preschool and school-age children. Speech sound disorders not only affect a child’s ability to communicate at a young age but also may lead to later speech and literacy difficulties. This journal self-study explores issues related to managing speech sound disorders, including assessment and treatment options. It also includes articles that identify predictors of future speech and literacy problems. Clinicians can use this information to help identify appropriate assessment tools and potential treatment options, as well as counsel parents and teachers of children who may be at risk for continuing speech and academic difficulties.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.55
Summary: Individuals with severe disabilities require services from many different providers to address their wide and varied needs. This journal self-study discusses the principles of interprofessional collaborative practice and why this approach may be the most appropriate way to provide services to those with severe disabilities. The articles discuss how interprofessional collaborative practice can improve outcomes for children with severe disabilities and describe specific examples of this type of practice, including suggestions about how SLPs can work with parents and other professionals to improve services for this challenging population. The articles utilize case studies to help illustrate key concepts.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: Distinguishing between language disorder and language difference can be a challenge when a child speaks a nonmainstream English dialect. This journal self-study presents research findings that clinicians can implement with this population in their practice. The assessment and intervention strategies and tools discussed in these articles will allow SLPs to deliver more effective services and promote academic success for children who speak nonmainstream English dialects.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: A child’s early language development can be used to predict later language and literacy skills, as well as school readiness and academic success. It has long been a challenge to distinguish children who are “late talkers” and will eventually develop age-appropriate language skills from those who might have a language delay that requires intervention. This journal self-study primarily examines issues related to assessing language disorders in preschoolers, in an attempt to identify those children who may be at risk for language and learning difficulties and would benefit from support. Specifically, articles examine risk factors for being a late talker, alternative methods of screening for language impairment, and the usefulness of parent and teacher reports when screening bilingual children. One final article discusses collecting and reporting outcomes for preschool children with speech and language disorders. Clinicians can use this information to improve their approach to language screening and outcomes reporting for preschoolers on their caseload.
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