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Presenter(s): Alliete R. Alfano, PhD, CCC-SLP, LSLS Cert. AVT; Jenna Voss, PhD, CED, LSLS Cert. AVEd
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.15
Summary: Audiologists and SLPs are critical team members who can support listening and spoken language outcomes for students who are deaf/hard of hearing (DHH). This webinar discusses auditory-verbal intervention as an approach for learners who are DHH and learning to listen and/or talk. The presenters explore foundational elements critical for success in auditory-verbal intervention, including audiologic assessment and management, caregiver engagement, and support from interprofessional teams.
Presenter(s): Noma B Anderson, PhD
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: Audiologists and SLPs can better serve individuals with disabilities when we are cognizant of ableism, implicit bias, and microaggressions. This on demand webinar explores perspectives on disability as well as the acquisition of a disability identity and voice. The speaker discusses the importance of allies and alliances and how clinicians can contribute to client, student, and patient empowerment.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: This SIG 19 activity bundles four articles providing perspectives on a broad variety of topics in speech-language pathology. First, Holt provides an overview of current and historical discussions of gender and race, challenging the reader to accept that one’s perspective is indebted to a specific belief system. Readers are to evaluate how gender and race are used to categorize people and examine whether a member of a marginalized or minoritized group affects that person’s access to or use of intervention services. Next, Cox and Koenig define speech privacy and provide a brief history and applications in the health care setting. A general perspective is outlined, including threats to speech privacy, and speakers who use an electrolarynx are used as an example to highlight specific issues clinicians may encounter. Ramanarayanan et al. discuss the use of speech as a biomarker in therapy and research. In summary, robustness of analytics—specificity, diversity, and physiological interpretability—must be further developed. Finally, Weerathunge, Tomassi, and Stepp review a number of populations with voice disorders that have been studied using altered auditory feedback. Many have hyperactive auditory feedback responses and the differing underling reasons are reviewed. Therapy considerations are also described.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: It is well known within our field that identifying voice and upper airway specialized training opportunities and subsequent positions is challenging, competitive, and sometimes elusive. In this SIG 3 activity, various pathways to specializing in voice and upper airway disorders are explored from the viewpoint of different authors at various stages of their careers. The hope is to make the process of specialization more transparent and share components that have contributed to success, while also highlighting the diversity of training and experience that is so important in our field.
Presenter(s): Ann C McMahon, AuD, CCC-A; Jerrold J Jackson, MA, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.25
Summary: Many clinicians find themselves responsible for supervising students, externs, clinical fellows, other clinicians, or support personnel, but have little or no training on clinical education and supervision. This course presents an updated version of the nine core "building blocks" that are essential elements of every supervision experience.
Presenter(s): Emily B Rubin, MS, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This session reviews the neuroscience and evidence-based practices that are essential considerations for creating learning environments that enhance active engagement for pre-symbolic autistic children. The session identifies high-priority objectives in social communication, emotional regulation, and creating learning environments for neurodiverse learners that promote active engagement.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: These four SIG 13 articles provide information for dysphagia practice. They address a unique array of special populations and challenges in patient care involving swallowing and feeding difficulties.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: The theme for this SIG 14 activity is self-reported confidence and knowledge between multilingual and monolingual speech-language pathologists in working with culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) individuals and assessment considerations when working with individuals who speak a language other than English. Topics include (a) examining differences between self-reported confidence and knowledge in multilingual and monolingual speech language pathologists; (b) nonword repetition in assessment; and (c) sound sequencing characteristics in words of children who speak German.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.25
Summary: In an ever-changing global landscape, it is pertinent that audiologists and speech-language pathologists “account for the complexity and diversity of healthcare contexts” (as stated in the second article by Pillay and Pillay). Pressing concerns related to advancing technology (artificial intelligence and machine learning), culturally responsive practice, and rapid climate change are all trending societal conversations. This SIG 17 self-study explores creative solutions to pressing global issues that impact the field of audiology and speech-language pathology. Topics presented include key ethical concerns regarding hearing aids with machine learning, a novel culturally responsive framework for contextualized clinical reasoning, and the impact of climate change on communication and swallowing disorders.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: The first article in this SIG 18 activity investigates the applications speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and audiologists used most frequently during the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. It also discusses the main obstacles to providing speech, language, and hearing services through telepractice. Through the international distribution of an electronic survey, a total of 1,466 surveys from SLPs and audiologists from 40 countries were used for the analysis. The second article discusses the Auditory Verbal UK's training program for prospective listening and spoken language specialist certified auditory verbal therapists delivered globally via telepractice. The article explores, from a global perspective, audiology and early intervention services and perspectives regarding telepractice. The third article explores parents' and therapists' views of the benefits and challenges of telepractice for early intervention for children who are deaf or hard of hearing during the COVID-19 pandemic. Through survey and analysis, the article probes the views of parents, Listening and Spoken Language Specialist Certified Auditory Verbal Therapists in using telepractice to deliver auditory verbal sessions.
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