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Results 21 - 30 of 77
Credit(s): PDHs: 8.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.85
Summary: SLPs are tasked with evaluating dual language learners (DLLs), often without speaking the language the child uses most. This journal self-study explores emerging practices that SLPs can use to improve overall assessment quality and outcomes when working with diverse DLLs.
Credit(s): PDHs: 7.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.75
Summary: This journal self-study course is composed of papers from a 2019 Research Forum, Advancing Statistical Methods in Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences. These selected articles provide advanced-level discussion about clinically relevant statistical methodologies to give audiologists a strong foundation from which to analyze and understand the statistical research they come across to decide when and how to apply it in practice. The articles examine frequential and Bayesian statistical methods as well as propensity scores and linear-mixed model analyses.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: This Perspectives forum focuses on the reading outcomes of students with hearing loss and cochlear implants. The first article examines the role of vocabulary on print knowledge for students with hearing loss. The second article provides recommendations for treating the listening and spoken language skills of students with hearing loss based on the results of a 2-year study. The third article compares how reading ability and working memory are impacted in students with cochlear implants and hearing aids after they participated in a computer-based program. The final article explores the relationship between language and reading ability in students with hearing impairment.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: For people experiencing dizziness, what are possible options for vestibular and balance rehabilitation? This self-study from Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups (SIG 7) addresses treatment choices in vestibular and balance rehabilitation, the state of the evidence on their efficacy, and future directions for interdisciplinary research and practice. Written by clinicians and scholars with expertise in audiology and physical therapy, the four articles present an interdisciplinary and life span approach to vestibular and balance rehabilitation for children and adults. The first article by Christy is on the use of vestibular and balance rehabilitation therapy for dizziness in children. Next, the review by Herdman focuses on the evolution of vestibular function tests and rehabilitation for major vestibular disorders as well as areas in which research and clinical practice may grow in the future. In Holmberg, the relatively new but common diagnosis of persistent postural-perceptual dizziness (PPPD) is presented in terms of its pathophysiology, differential diagnosis, and treatment protocols. Finally, Clendaniel provides a review on the use of vestibular rehabilitation in the treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Included are detailed photos and illustrations of current techniques and exercises. As described in the introduction to the forum by Guest Editor Neil Shepard, PhD, “It is hoped that these four articles will provide a needed look at vestibular and balance rehabilitation therapy (VBRT) so the audiologist can serve as a productive member of the treatment team and have a good understanding as to everything that
Credit(s): PDHs: 7.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.7
Summary: This journal self-study course highlights various instructional strategies that demonstrate positive progress for students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The findings and recommendations can assist SLPs in choosing strategies that produce targeted outcomes for students with ASD on their caseload.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.25
Summary: This collection of articles presents clinicians with information on some of the most timesensitive topics in dysphagia care of utmost relevance, particularly in the current COVID- 19 pandemic. Firstly, Liza Blumenfeld, Lisa Evangelista, Maggie Kuhn, Kristen Linnemeyer, Nogah Nativ-Zeltzer, and Heather Starmer provide best practice recommendations on the management of patients with head and neck cancers from the speech-language pathology perspective amid COVID-19. Authors Hema Desia and Jennifer Raminick then provide recommendations for safer feeding of infants on high flow oxygen therapy due to acute respiratory failure. Lastly, authors Grainne Brady and Justin Roe, Kellyn Hall and Leslie Johnson, and Annette Askren and Marnie Kershner discuss different aspects of clinician–patient collaborated dysphagia care delivery models and their impact on successful outcomes.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: First, Julie Case and Maria Grigos provide a review of speech motor control literature in childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) and give clinical implications to the assessment and treatment of CAS. Second, Kristen Allison reviews approaches to measuring speech intelligibility in children with motor speech disorders. Third, Tricia McCabe, Donna Thomas, and Elizabeth Murray describe Rapid Syllable Transition Treatment (ReST) as a treatment for CAS. Fourth, Nancy Tarshis, Michelle Winner, and Pamela Crooke explore how communication challenges in CAS impact social competency and how speech motor challenges impact social development. Finally, Nina Benway and Jonathan Preston evaluate if features of CAS in the literature could be replicated in a sample of school-age children. Readers will describe how speech motor skills have been found to change with practice in CAS, list the linguistic factors that can influence intelligibility, describe the quality of the research that supports ReST, explain ways to consider social cognition in therapy for CAS, and rank the speech features that distinguish the narrow phonetic transcriptions of children with CAS and speech sound disorders.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: This exercise highlights three articles. First, a qualitative research study with multiple high school student participants with deafness/hearing loss examining factors that promoted versus challenged their access to classroom communication and participation is included. The next article is a preliminary study exploring that children with reading impairments are more likely to fail hearing screenings that children with typical reading skills. Finally, the third article looks at shared book reading and its association with language growth aspects for children who are deaf and hard of hearing over a 4-week training program related to caregiver knowledge of emergent literacy features
Credit(s): PDHs: 9.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.9
Summary: This journal self-study course is composed of papers from a 2019 Research Forum, Advancing Statistical Methods in Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences. These selected articles provide advanced-level discussion about clinically relevant statistical methodologies to give speech-language pathologists a stronger foundation from which to analyze and understand the statistical research they come across to decide when and how to apply it in practice.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 10) articles explore several issues related to student success. Sylvan, Brock, Perkins, and Garret examine prerequisites required by graduate programs in speech-language pathology across the United States. Roitsch, Murphy, and Raymer investigate the relationship between executive functions and academic outcomes in speech-language pathology graduate students. Richardson, Roberts, and Victor explore ways to predict the clinical success of graduate students studying speechlanguage pathology. Look, Shoemaker, Hoepner, and Blake discover benefits of engaging undergraduate students in research.
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