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Results 11 - 20 of 77
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: Even before the COVID-19 pandemic required clinicians to rapidly adapt their practice for remote service provision, researchers were already exploring effective telehealth approaches for audiology. The articles in this journal self-study (selected from a special issue of the American Journal of Audiology, “4th International Meeting on Internet and Audiology”) examine teleaudiology tools and methodologies for hearing screenings, home-based auditory assessment for people who use cochlear implants, assessing hearing aid outcomes using ecological momentary assessment (EMA), and a tool for evaluating hearing aid performance.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: This activity includes two articles related to language and literacy intervention for children with hearing loss and deafness. In the first article, Stephanie Mary Raymond and Tring D. Spencer investigate the effect of narrative language intervention on the narrative retelling skills and vocabulary use of children with hearing loss. In the second article, Krystal L. Werfel and Sarah Lawrence describe specific considerations for print-referencing interventions for children with hearing loss along with a case study. The respective authors conclude that print referencing, with specific considerations for children with hearing loss, may be an effective emergent literacy intervention to increase conceptual print knowledge for children preschool-age with hearing loss; and narrative intervention is promising for facilitating language skills improvement for children with hearing loss. Both studies require replication for their findings.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.55
Summary: This Perspectives activity focuses on communication choice and agency for individuals on the autism spectrum. These individuals are the key informants in decisions around the conceptualization, implementation, and evaluation of educational programming for autistic learners. Speaking autistic adults encourage families, professionals, and society to promote and accept all communication as equal.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: This activity focuses on the childhood maltreatment consequences on social pragmatic communication. Based on a complex family and social conception of neglect, a logical model illustrating public health services for children experiencing neglect is proposed. The role of speech-language pathology in prevention, policy, and practice is outlined. The importance of assessing the narrative language of children exposed to complex trauma is also emphasized.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.25
Summary: This SIG 16 Perspectives activity highlights novel approaches to eligibility decision-making, intervention, and the roles and responsibilities of school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs). In the first article, the authors present a novel approach to evaluation and eligibility. Farquharson, Coleman, Moore, and Montgomery showcase how SLPs can utilize and apply a design thinking framework when making eligibility recommendations for children with oral and written language disorders. The authors give two sample eligibility predicaments and give examples of five design thinking questions (discovery, interpretation, ideation, experimentation, evolution) for each scenario. In the second article, we learn about a novel approach to intervention. Here, Page and Johnson provide a summary of electropalatographic therapy for the remediation of speech sound disorders. They also systematically reviewed the literature to summarize the extent to which this intervention technique is supported for use with children with Down syndrome. Lastly, the last group of authors discuss novel roles and responsibilities that school-based SLPs may assume. In this article, Seal and Power-deFur discuss the similarities and differences between a fact witness and an expert witness, while also providing school-based professionals with ideas of how to prepare for these roles if called to testify in a special education dispute or civil litigation case.
Credit(s): PDHs: 8.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.8
Summary: Studies have shown that grammar is foundational to a child’s communication and academic growth. SLPs who work with children with development language disorders (DLD) – regardless of the etiology of the disorder – need effective research-based grammar interventions in their toolbox. The articles in this journal self-study (selected from a Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools forum, “Morphosyntax Assessment and Intervention for Children”) describe evidence-based approaches for grammar assessment and treatment and provide tools to support goal-setting and progress monitoring. The articles discuss new approaches and practical implications for practice.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: This journal self-study focuses on rationale and techniques for enhancing clinicians’ cultural competence when working in Native American and tribal communities. The articles, originally published in a 2016 issue of Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups (SIG 14, Cultural and Linguistic Diversity), address the lasting impact of historical trauma on health and education; the importance of differentiated instruction; the perspective of a student with hearing loss who experiences traditional cultural education; and speech-language intervention programs and services in Native communities.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: This journal self-study course highlights the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on people with aphasia, patients with cognitive communication impairments, and patient-provider communication. The findings can inform decision-making and assist SLPs in optimizing treatment for communication challenges for patients with COVID-19 as well as those for whom treatment has been altered as a result of the pandemic.
Credit(s): PDHs: 6.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.65
Summary: This Perspectives activity focuses on the assessment and treatment of school-age students with social language deficits. Articles focus on conversational profiles for students with autism and intervention strategies appropriate for students within each profile; the benefit of using analog tasks with toddlers through adolescents to evaluate social communication abilities and guide intervention; best practices in assessing students with social communication deficits; and how effective commercially available standardized tests are for evaluating the social and pragmatic language deficits of students with social pragmatic communication disorder within and separate from autism.
Credit(s): PDHs: 7.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.7
Summary: SLPs are working with an increasing number of children and families who identify as bilingual, multilingual, or dual language learners (DLLs). This journal self-study explores how family expectations can impact the effectiveness of interventions, how expectations may vary across cultures, and what SLP interventions are considered evidence-based when working with DLLs and culturally and linguistically diverse families.
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