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Credit(s): PDHs: 5.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.55
Summary: Stuttering can have a negative effect on a child’s self-esteem and self-confidence. It also affects parents, who may not understand how to support their child. This journal self-study contains a selection of articles from the October 2018 American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology special issue based on sessions and posters from the 11th Oxford Dysfluency Conference. The conference, held every 3 years, seeks to integrate research and clinical practice in fluency disorders. Clinicians will be able to use the specific techniques and activities described in these articles to help parents and children approach stuttering differently and improve outcomes.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: The articles in this journal self-study highlight potential benefits of video games in the clinic and classroom. The articles demonstrate how gaming principles and applied video game design can result in measurable behavioral changes across populations that SLPs serve. The first article describes principles of video games that can enhance efficiency and motivation in intervention and then illustrates these principles in a case study. The second article describes the social-emotional benefits of video games as a leisure activity according to individuals with autism spectrum disorder. The final three demonstrate practical applications of video games for motor learning in individuals with velopharyngeal dysfunction and hypokinetic dysarthria as well as for classroom-based learning.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.55
Summary: Technology has irrefutably expanded the availability of speech and language services to populations that are more difficult to serve due to mobility challenges and/or remote locations. The articles in this journal self-study illustrate how telepractice – including mixed-service delivery models that incorporate both clinic and telepractice components –can enhance telehabilitation and telerehabilitation practices across a range of communication disorders.
Credit(s): PDHs: 6.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.65
Summary: As a result of recent laws and regulations, more SLPs in schools are treating children with dyslexia. The journal articles in this self-study – from an October 2018 Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools clinical forum on dyslexia – provide “state-of-the-science” information to help SLPs understand dyslexia in relation to other speech and language disorders, as well as ways to identify, assess, and treat this disorder. Clinicians will find practical tips that they can immediately incorporate into practice.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.55
Summary: Communication disorders in children may affect social interactions and lead to negative emotional and behavioral outcomes. This journal self-study explores well-being, resilience, and emotional competence in school-age children. The articles discuss ways to identify risk factors to emotional well-being (including victimization and bullying), assess emotional competence, and support emotional expression in children who use AAC. The final article explores counseling and the role the SLP plays in addressing emotional issues as a part of intervention.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: Despite best practices, many clients eventually discontinue using their hearing aids. Though a number of reasons may explain this behavior, declining patient satisfaction is perhaps one of the most significant. The articles in this journal self-study explore ways to improve hearing aid outcomes by targeting patient satisfaction through increased self-efficacy. The first article establishes an overall framework for client satisfaction by identifying essential concepts underlying hearing aid management. The second article describes a new area of research regarding self-fitting, which promotes self-efficacy by involving clients in adjusting their own hearing aids from day 1. The third article examines psychosocial benefits and improved satisfaction resulting from hearing aid trials. The final article empirically tests the connection between self-efficacy of specific management skills and hearing aid satisfaction.
Credit(s): PDHs: 7.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.7
Summary: Taking into account children’s learning processes is important when SLPs design interventions aimed at teaching new skills or expanding abilities. This journal self-study – based on a special issue of Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools – focuses on the type of learning that happens implicitly and quickly, without effort or even the knowledge that we are learning. This type of learning – known as statistical learning – refers to the way that children recognize patterns in the world around them. As language is full of patterns, this type of learning plays a large role in how children learn sound production, words, grammatical structures, and more. The articles in this selfstudy explore how SLPs can capitalize on implicit learning processes during intervention to help learning happen faster.
Credit(s): PDHs: 9.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.95
Summary: This journal self study explores the nature of working memory and its relationship to language and learning. The articles – from a recently published Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools clinical forum – discuss working memory and how it relates to language development; executive functions and working memory as they relate to bilingualism, math, and decoding; and practical assessment and treatment strategies related to working memory and language. Clinicians can use this research to improve their assessment and intervention processes to help students with memory deficits succeed.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: This journal self-study explores issues related to service provision for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) by taking learners through the typical intervention process. The course starts with a review of speech sound assessments for children with ASD, an area that is not as commonly addressed in this population as other areas of communication. It then moves to how documentation of assessment results can be improved by adopting a strengths-based approach. A discussion of how SLPs in the U.S. and Taiwan use evidence-based interventions for ASD follows. And the course concludes with a discussion of an innovative way to approach social skills and friendships for children with ASD. Each article includes specific recommendations that clinicians can incorporate immediately into practice to improve all aspects of service provision for children with ASD.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: Feeding and swallowing problems in children take many forms and are often intertwined with other aspects of a child’s development. This journal self-study explores some of these interactions, including the relationship between feeding and swallowing disorders and language impairment, as well as connections between hearing and feeding/ swallowing. The self-study also includes information on how mealtime duration relates to severity of feeding and swallowing problems in children with cerebral palsy, as well as how a family-centered intervention can address mealtime behaviors in children with autism spectrum disorder. Clinicians will be able to immediately apply the information in these articles to improve management of pediatric feeding and swallowing disorders.
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