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Credit(s): PDHs: 7.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.7
Summary: This journal self-study course highlights various instructional strategies that demonstrate positive progress for students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The findings and recommendations can assist SLPs in choosing strategies that produce targeted outcomes for students with ASD on their caseload.
Credit(s): PDHs: 9.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.9
Summary: This journal self-study course is composed of papers from a 2019 Research Forum, Advancing Statistical Methods in Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences. These selected articles provide advanced-level discussion about clinically relevant statistical methodologies to give speech-language pathologists a stronger foundation from which to analyze and understand the statistical research they come across to decide when and how to apply it in practice.
Credit(s): PDHs: 6.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.6
Summary: A 2019 Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools forum, Vocabulary Across the School Grades, presented evidence that strong vocabulary is important for students’ literacy and overall academic success across grade levels. The articles in this journal self-study course describe effective instructional strategies for facilitating vocabulary growth and improving reading comprehension in middle and high school students. The authors present recommendations and implications for practice.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: This journal self-study updates clinicians on advances in the field that can refine current diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). Two articles address assessment: One examines how type of stimuli can affect differential diagnosis of CAS, and the other identifies possible red flags in young children by examining characteristics of speech production in infants and toddlers who were later diagnosed with CAS. Two additional articles address advances in intervention for CAS: One looks at the efficacy of adding prosody as a treatment component, and the other explores a model-based treatment protocol.
Credit(s): PDHs: 6.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.6
Summary: This journal self-study course compares language performance in children with and without cochlear implants from preschool to 6th grade. The articles examine levels of language from phonology to prosody, offering insights into areas of strength and weakness as well as clinical directions. The first article examines consonant acquisition patterns based on hearing exposure. The second and third articles compare morphosyntactic, lexical, and phonological awareness profiles, the effect of literacy on each language skill, and types of errors produced in school-age children with and without cochlear implants. The fourth article explores differences in word-learning strategies that could affect lexical development and offers clinical suggestions based on these findings. The final article explores children’s abilities to discriminate emotional intent based on suprasegmental characteristics in the speech signal.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: SLPs who work with children who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) need a broad base of knowledge in evidence-based assessment, system designs, and implementation practices, particularly as technological innovations in AAC proliferate. This journal self-study explores of all of the above. The first article provides a useful framework for assessment that distinguishes essential components according to the child’s motor and cognitive abilities. Two articles examine design features: The first examines consistency of symbol location to increase efficiency, and the second looks at characteristics of naturalistic displays and their effects on gaze behavior according to clinical profiles. The final article in this self-study reviews practices for training communication partners of children who use AAC.
Credit(s): PDHs: 9.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.95
Summary: This journal self-study includes select papers that were presented at the 2017 Clinical Aphasiology Conference in Snowbird, Utah. The articles reflect the wide array of topics presented on aphasia treatment, tools, and outcomes. Also included is an article that ties ideas from the conference keynote to research in communication disorders. Clinicians can expand their knowledge by learning about the current state of aphasia research.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: This self-study features highly read and cited audiology research articles published in 2017 in ASHA’s scholarly journals. Topics reflect the diversity of the field and include: (1) a discussion of the economic impact of hearing loss in the U.S., (2) ways to improve museum accessibility for people with hearing loss, (3) how improvements in early detection of hearing loss has impacted children’s literacy outcomes, and (4) the impact of an audiologist’s language on hearing aid uptake.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: This self-study includes work presented at the Third International Meeting on Internet and Audiology. The articles discuss innovations in audiology, with a focus on teleaudiology and eHealth services. Readers will learn about Internet programs and smartphone applications that assist with the management of hearing and hearing-related issues, as well as how data collected through these means may influence public policy.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: This self-study is composed of research presented at the 2017 ASHA Convention Research Symposium, “Advances in Autism Research: From Learning Mechanisms to Novel Interventions.” These journal articles – published as part of a 2018 research forum in the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research – explore the clinical implications of current research on SLPs’ work with children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Specific topics include ways to personalize intervention, the interaction between language and executive functioning, how a child’s ability to interact differently with their environment impacts communication, and factors that may influence the development of shape bias, which is an important factor in vocabulary development.
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