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Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: These articles explore how the international world of speech-language pathology and audiology is expanding, and, with it, are opportunities to practice, share, and provide education around the world. The articles discuss sharing resources between speech-language pathologists and audiologists, regardless of practice setting.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 17) articles present a collaborative initiative of the Committee of International Representatives of the International Cluttering Association. Reichel et al., discuss the initiative that began with the Inaugural Joint World Congress in Japan in 2018. Van Zaalen and Reichel present and discuss the auditory-visual feedback training methodology. Gosselin and Ward affirm that cluttering is a fluency disorder that is mainly characterized by an abnormally rapid or irregular rate of speech. Their pilot study expanded the evidence base by using a Stroop Task to investigate attention performance in people with cluttering. Hilda Sønsterud discuss the term working alliance as an important concept in cluttering and stuttering therapy and describe the degree to which the therapy dyad is engaged in collaborative, purposive work.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 8) articles cover a wide range of audiology and public health research and clinical topics. There are three original research reports and one clinical review. In the first research report, Roman et al. examine the impact of reduced audibility and speaker voice on the mini-mental state examination score in a group of young adults without cognitive impairment. Next, Beamer et al. conduct a preliminary study to investigate the role of a hearing loss prevention education strategies in an active duty military population. Reavis et al. estimate the association between tinnitus and self-reported depression symptoms and between tinnitus and perceived anxiety in a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults. The final article by Henry and Manning is a review article on sound therapy approaches and clinical options for tinnitus management.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.25
Summary: These SIG 8 Perspectives articles focus on topics that are important in promoting public health audiology. In “Fundamentals of Epidemiology for the Audiologist,” Torre and Reavis provide an overview of basic epidemiologic concepts including study design, prevalence, incidence, risk ratios, and odds ratios. The authors emphasize that an understanding of epidemiology is crucial for audiologists for a variety of reasons, including to help them assess the quality of publications, evaluate and discuss the efficacy of screening methods, and evaluate and communicate risk factors for ear and hearing problems. In “Hearing Health Care Delivery Outside the Booth,” Gates, Hecht, Grantham, Fallon, and Martukovich review the literature on boothless audiometry and introduce current tools used to deliver hearing health care outside of the traditional clinic setting. From their review, the authors conclude that boothless audiometry technology provides an opportunity for audiologists to expand services to nontraditional settings such as waiting grooms and nursing homes, increasing access to care, early identification, and intervention, and therefore improving health outcomes.