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Presenter(s): Sarah Murphy Gregory, MS, CCC-SLP; Brooke E Hatfield, MS, CCC-SLP; Hannah Foley, BA; Kelly Fonner, MS
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This recorded dialogue features an AAC user and two assistive technology experts, who discuss various aspects of implementing AAC in schools, including intervention strategies, working with other school professionals, and making the most of your time to have the biggest impact. The exchange was recorded at the 2021 online conference "Expanding AAC: Accessible Strategies for Functional Communication" and is a companion to two recorded sessions from the conference: Integrating AAC in School Settings (Kelly Fonner, MS) and Engaging and Manageable School-Based AAC Telepractice (Sarah Gregory, MS, CCC-SLP, and Hannah Foley, BA). The dialogue was moderated by Brooke Hatfield, MS, CCC-SLP.
Presenter(s): Sarah Conger; Juliet B Weinhold, PhD, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This session presents a study of 19 children ages 5-7 with inaccurate /r/ who were followed every 3 months until they acquired /r/ or turned 8 years old, whichever came first. Acquisition was determined for three separate allophones of /r/: vocalic, prevocalic, and postvocalic.
Presenter(s): Gayla L. Poling, PhD, CCC-A
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: Hundreds of medications commonly prescribed for anticancer treatments and some infections are known to cause auditory and/or vestibular dysfunction, known as ototoxicity. This course discusses early detection of ototoxicity through increased awareness, leveraging current tools, and clinical practice approaches for serial monitoring, all of which can provide care teams opportunities to identify adverse effects, modify treatment plans to mitigate hearing loss, and utilize individualized interventions. The speaker discusses strategies for preventing or minimizing cochlear damage to preserve quality of life for patients receiving treatment and to reduce the societal burden of hearing loss.
Presenter(s): Michelle A Woodcock, MA; Teresa K Laney, MS, CCC-SLP; Verna M Chinen, MS, CCC-SLP; Perry F Flynn, MEd, CCC-SLP; Barbara J Conrad; Marie C Ireland, MEd, CCC-SLP, BCS-CL; Andrea L Bertone, MS, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This course focuses on lessons learned and information about student progress in schools as well as regulatory changes resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic. Presenters discuss states' approaches to equity in education, nondiscriminatory evaluations, and strategies to document educational impact and to support families and school SLPs.
Presenter(s): Cynthia K Atcheson, MS, CCC-SLP; Amy D Hogue, MA, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This session explores how school-based SLPs can provide students in remote areas with services that are of equal value and effectiveness as those they provide to students in larger population centers. Speakers share resources and service delivery options to empower SLPs to provide and promote remote service delivery. This course is a recorded session from the 2022 ASHA Schools Connect online conference.
Presenter(s): Harvey B. Abrams, PhD
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: Prior to 2020, a remote model of hearing health care had been applied primarily to remote populations and/or limited to hearing screening and counseling services. Now, in the face of a global pandemic that makes face-to-face services risky, there has been an urgent demand for more information about teleaudiology. This session will review the evolution of teleaudiology, including provider and patient attitudes concerning the perceived benefits, disadvantages, and outcomes associated with remote audiologic care. The speaker will describe an existing, commercial, patient-centered teleaudiology model of hearing health care that is designed to increase accessibility and reduce cost while maintaining the audiologist’s central role as a critical component of care throughout the patient journey.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.25
Summary: The articles in this course present models for increasing equity and inclusion across our discipline. Girolamo and Ghali introduce a student-led grassroots initiative that supports minority students at all levels. Mohapatra and Mohan propose a model for increasing student diversity and inclusion based on successful programs from other health-related disciplines. Finally, Mishra et al. examine three challenges that faculty of color face: cultural competency, imposter syndrome, and racial microaggressions.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: The theme for this Perspectives course is clinical considerations in assessment of children and adults from culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) backgrounds and providing culturally supporting treatment settings. Topics include (a) acoustic parameters of retroflex sounds, (b) the two-question method for assessing gender identity, (c) assessment recommendations for new language learners, and (d) creating culturally supportive settings to foster literacy development.
Presenter(s): Maja Katusic, MD; Kelly Brytowski, MA, CCC-SLP; Becky S Baas, MA, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This course explores the common journeys children with motor speech disorders and their families undertake when seeking diagnosis and treatment. The speakers discuss the medical workup, the role of expert SLPs, and the partnerships among the medical and educational teams serving children.
Presenter(s): Erika Shakespeare, CCC-A
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: The global COVID-19 pandemic has introduced a level of disruption into our personal and professional lives that was previously unimaginable. How we respond will be a deciding factor for the future success of our practices. This session will explore how to embrace change and use this unique opportunity to rethink how we provide and promote our services. The speaker will discuss specific ways audiologists who operate private practices can clearly articulate their distinctive role in the hearing health marketplace and be prepared for future interruptions such as pandemics, big box stores, online retailers, and personal indecision.
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