ASHA Learning Pass

Visit the ASHA coronavirus resource pages to stay on top of all the latest resources and supports specific to issues related to COVID-19.

Filter Courses By
Experience
Instructional Level
Credit(s): PDHs: 7.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.7
Summary: First, Katie Strong and Barbara Shadden provide an overview of the relationship between narrative, identity, and social co-construction for persons with aphasia and narrative treatment approaches for identity renegotiation. Second, Jamie Azios and Jack Damico relate the Lifetime Participation Approach to Aphasia (LPAA) and issues in longterm care (LTC) along with practice recommendations for implementing LPAA in LTC. Third, Jerry Hoepner and Tom Sather examine the potential approaches for teaching and mentoring students in LPAA. Fourth, Rochelle Cohen-Schneider, Melodie Chan, Denise McCall, Allison Tedesco, and Ann Abramson explore balancing relationshipcentered care and professionalism. Finally, Sarah Wallace, Elena Donoso Brown, Anna Saylor, Erica Lapp, and Joanna Eskander describe aphasia-friendly modifications for occupational therapy assessments and home programs.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 7) articles address therapy, patient education/counseling, and novel eHealth programs to serve clients across the lifespan. The topic of multisensory integration is addressed with a review of cognitive neuroscience literature and recommendations are made for therapy protocols for infants and children with hearing loss. There is a review of the development and outcomes of a multimedia education program for adults with hearing loss. The use of eHealth in patient-centered care for adults with hearing loss is considered for current practice and its future directions. Authors discuss considerations for the use of remote microphone technology by the oldest generation of patients. Finally, patient-centered strategies for communication during audiology consultations are presented to build trust and positive therapeutic relationships.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: For people experiencing dizziness, what are possible options for vestibular and balance rehabilitation? This self-study from Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups (SIG 7) addresses treatment choices in vestibular and balance rehabilitation, the state of the evidence on their efficacy, and future directions for interdisciplinary research and practice. Written by clinicians and scholars with expertise in audiology and physical therapy, the four articles present an interdisciplinary and life span approach to vestibular and balance rehabilitation for children and adults. The first article by Christy is on the use of vestibular and balance rehabilitation therapy for dizziness in children. Next, the review by Herdman focuses on the evolution of vestibular function tests and rehabilitation for major vestibular disorders as well as areas in which research and clinical practice may grow in the future. In Holmberg, the relatively new but common diagnosis of persistent postural-perceptual dizziness (PPPD) is presented in terms of its pathophysiology, differential diagnosis, and treatment protocols. Finally, Clendaniel provides a review on the use of vestibular rehabilitation in the treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Included are detailed photos and illustrations of current techniques and exercises. As described in the introduction to the forum by Guest Editor Neil Shepard, PhD, “It is hoped that these four articles will provide a needed look at vestibular and balance rehabilitation therapy (VBRT) so the audiologist can serve as a productive member of the treatment team and have a good understanding as to everything that