ASHA Learning Pass

Log in and check out the Dashboard to view featured courses.

Filter Courses By
Experience
Instructional Level
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 10) articles explore several issues related to student success. Sylvan, Brock, Perkins, and Garret examine prerequisites required by graduate programs in speech-language pathology across the United States. Roitsch, Murphy, and Raymer investigate the relationship between executive functions and academic outcomes in speech-language pathology graduate students. Richardson, Roberts, and Victor explore ways to predict the clinical success of graduate students studying speechlanguage pathology. Look, Shoemaker, Hoepner, and Blake discover benefits of engaging undergraduate students in research.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.25
Summary: Ethnic and racial disparities within the fields of audiology and speech-language pathology have been well documented. Demographic data from the most recent ASHA survey revealed that 6.1% of ASHA members identify as Hispanic or Latino and 8.5% as “racial minorities.” These numbers are significantly below those of the overall U.S. population—16.3% and 27.6%, respectively, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. The articles in this collection present models for increasing equity and inclusion across our disciple. Girolamo and Ghali introduce a student-led grassroots initiative that supports minority students at all levels. Mohapatra and Mohan propose a model for increasing student diversity and inclusion based on successful programs from other health-related disciplines. Finally, Mishra et al. examined three challenges that faculty of color face: cultural competency, imposter syndrome, and racial microaggressions.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: In these Perspectives (SIG 10) Roos and Schreck examine the stress experienced by undergraduate students in communication sciences and disorders (CSD), including stress levels, reasons for stress, stress management, and knowledge/use of campus resources to address stress. Shah and Galantino address building the emotional intelligence of undergraduate students studying CSD through exercises completed in class. Sylvan, Perkins, and Tuglio study the experiences and perceptions of CSD students applying to master’s degree programs, including deciding factors for top choices of graduate programs, emotional involvement in the application process, biases/rumors heard, student challenges, advice to future applicants, and what students would change about the application process. Finally, Crais and Savage present an examination of CSD graduates’ perceptions of their PhD program, including challenges they faced, facilitators for success, their preparation for research/teaching/job readiness, and ways PhD education might be improved.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: In this activity, four recent SIG 10 articles are presented. First, Domsch, Stiritz, and Huff utilized a mixed-methods design to examine the cultural awareness of students in communication sciences and disorders (CSD) during and after a study-abroad experience. Next, Franca, Boyer, and Pegoraro-Krook explored activities designed to promote cultural and clinical competence in a collaboration between CSD programs in the United States and Brazil. Then, Veyvoda and Van Cleave reviewed the literature on service-learning and community-engaged learning, described how these approaches could be used in distance-learning modalities, and explored how doing so could be accomplished during and after the COVID-19 pandemic. Finally, Towson et al. studied the effectiveness of coaching paired with the use of a mixed-reality simulator as CSD students practiced interprofessional communication skills in role-play scenarios.