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Credit(s): PDHs: 6.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.65
Summary: The articles in this journal self-study focus on the characterization and clinical management of aphasia, one theme that researchers explored in the 2020 Clinical Aphasiology Conference (CAC) forum. Published in the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, these articles present cutting-edge research and discussion on word finding difficulties, sematic processing, and spoken discourse.
Credit(s): PDHs: 6.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.6
Summary: Concussion - or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) - is a unique injury that is different from more severe brain injury, and addressing the associated cognitive deficits requires personalized, targeted interventions These articles discuss research and practical implications for the management of cognitive symptoms of mTBI, including defining the role of the SLP on interdisciplinary management teams, exploring specific assessment and treatment strategies, and emphasizing functional, personalized goals. The articles are from a 2021 American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology forum "Interdisciplinary Management of Concussion or Mild TBI." The articles provide evidence and strategies to increase clinician confidence and effectiveness when working with individuals with concussion or mTBI.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: This journal self-study includes select papers on conversation and discourse production that were presented at the 49th Clinical Aphasiology Conference (2019) in Whitefish, Montana. The articles reflect the current state of research on treatments to improve conversation and discourse production for people with aphasia.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: This journal self-study course highlights the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on people with aphasia, patients with cognitive communication impairments, and patient-provider communication. The findings can inform decision-making and assist SLPs in optimizing treatment for communication challenges for patients with COVID-19 as well as those for whom treatment has been altered as a result of the pandemic.
Credit(s): PDHs: 11.5, ASHA CEUs*: 1.15
Summary: This journal self-study course is composed of papers from the 7th Aging and Speech Communication Conference (April 2019). The articles cover a range of topics about speech processing in normal aging, including changes in auditory pathways and cortical structures in older adults with and without hearing loss; the relationship between cognitive skills and hearing performance in older adults; speech perception of older and younger adults when certain linguistic factors are manipulated; and age-related effects of processing accented speech in native and non-native speakers.
Credit(s): PDHs: 8.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.8
Summary: This journal self-study course is composed of papers from the Research Symposium at the 2018 ASHA Convention. The articles summarize much of the accumulating evidence regarding neurological change in post-stroke aphasia recovery. The range of topics covered in this self-study include neurological recovery patterns according to phase of recovery and treatment target (e.g., word vs. sentence), neurological and genetic factors that influence recovery, and methodological considerations to increase validity of findings. These articles will appeal to researchers and clinicians looking for current evidence on dependent neuroplasticity after stroke.
Credit(s): PDHs: 9.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.9
Summary: This journal self-study course is composed of papers from a 2019 Research Forum, Advancing Statistical Methods in Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences. These selected articles provide advanced-level discussion about clinically relevant statistical methodologies to give speech-language pathologists a stronger foundation from which to analyze and understand the statistical research they come across to decide when and how to apply it in practice.
Credit(s): PDHs: 6.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.6
Summary: This journal self-study course compares language performance in children with and without cochlear implants from preschool to 6th grade. The articles examine levels of language from phonology to prosody, offering insights into areas of strength and weakness as well as clinical directions. The first article examines consonant acquisition patterns based on hearing exposure. The second and third articles compare morphosyntactic, lexical, and phonological awareness profiles, the effect of literacy on each language skill, and types of errors produced in school-age children with and without cochlear implants. The fourth article explores differences in word-learning strategies that could affect lexical development and offers clinical suggestions based on these findings. The final article explores children’s abilities to discriminate emotional intent based on suprasegmental characteristics in the speech signal.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: The articles in this journal self-study provide clinically applicable evidence and critiques of current practices for working with older adults, with the goal of encouraging clinicians to go beyond treating impairments in isolation and instead to use patient-centered practices to increase life participation and quality of life. Two of the articles closely examine situations in long-term care facilities: (1) differing perceptions of food texture modification by professionals and staff and (2) improving communication opportunities for residents with aphasia in traditional long-term care facilities. The second two articles analyze interventions for individuals with cognitive impairment, addressing (1) improving behavioral symptoms by treating hearing loss and (2) providing direct communication intervention for individuals with moderate to severe dementia.
Credit(s): PDHs: 9.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.95
Summary: This journal self-study includes select papers that were presented at the 2017 Clinical Aphasiology Conference in Snowbird, Utah. The articles reflect the wide array of topics presented on aphasia treatment, tools, and outcomes. Also included is an article that ties ideas from the conference keynote to research in communication disorders. Clinicians can expand their knowledge by learning about the current state of aphasia research.
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