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Presenter(s): Gail M. Whitelaw, PhD
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: In this on demand webinar, speaker Gail Whitelaw discusses assessment and management of tinnitus in the pediatric population, including the potential impacts of tinnitus on all aspects of the lives of children and adolescents.
Presenter(s): Alyssa Whinna, AuD; Michael Hoffer, MD; James Buskirk, PT, SCS
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: This session provides an interdisciplinary (audiology, otology, and physical therapy) perspective on management of patients with dizziness, specifically geared toward cutting-edge management techniques and recommendations for care. The panel presentation discusses surgical and nonsurgical approaches and clinical cases to highlight patient benefits and improved clinical outcomes. A question-and-answer period concludes the presentation. This course was presented and recorded at the 2019 ASHA Convention. The session was developed by, and presenters invited by, Hearing, Vestibular, Tinnitus - Assessment and Intervention: Adult.
Presenter(s): Colleen O'Brien; Aniruddha K. Deshpande, PhD
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: The quality of online medical information can conflict with evidence-based research. Tinnitus is a target for misinformation and bogus treatments due to its prevalence and lack of objective treatments. This presentation discusses a study that assessed how people with and without tinnitus respond to online misinformation regarding tinnitus and determined whether a counseling session regarding causes and management of tinnitus affected susceptibility to misinformation. This course was presented and recorded at the 2019 ASHA Convention.
Presenter(s): Melissa Newell, AuD, CCC-A, FAAA
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: Meniere’s disease (MD) rarely occurs in children. Due to this, care and treatment by knowledgeable clinicians and physicians are lacking. This presentation reviews a case of a 10-year-old male with diagnosed MD, the interdisciplinary approach for care and treatment, the cross-facility approach for obtaining best results, and follow-up hearing aid fitting suggestions for the affected ear. This course was presented and recorded at the 2019 ASHA Convention.
Presenter(s): Kristen Janky, AuD, PhD, CCC-A; Lauren Calandruccio, PhD, CCC-A
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: Vestibular loss can co-occur with hearing loss. One functional effect of vestibular loss is decreased dynamic visual acuity. There is some speculation that vestibular loss can also affect reading and/or reading acuity. This presentation outlines the relationship between vestibular loss and both dynamic and static visual acuity and its possible effect on reading and other daily activities. This course was presented and recorded at the 2019 ASHA Convention. The session was developed by, and presenters invited by, Hearing, Tinnitus, and Vestibular Science.
Presenter(s): Ishan S Bhatt; Nilesh Washnik
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: Young musicians are exposed to traumatic sound levels that might increase their risk for tinnitus and noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Music and noise are known environmental risk factors for tinnitus and NIHL. This course examines a hypothesis that genetic variants might further explain clinical heterogeneity in tinnitus and NIHL.
Presenter(s): Frederick (Erick) J. Gallun, PhD
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: Concussion care requires a team with the collective expertise to address all factors that are likely to influence a patient's abilities and performance. This session provides an overview of cutting-edge, emerging research about how brain injury can affect auditory and balance functions. This course is a recorded session from the 2020 online conference “Maximizing Functional Outcomes for Individuals With Traumatic Brain Injuries.”
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 6) articles focus on diagnostic tools and considerations for management of several challenging patient populations in audiology. The first article discusses utilizing magnetic resonance imaging to determine the functional and structural neural alterations associated with chronic tinnitus. Researchers are utilizing advanced imaging techniques to study variability in perceptual characteristics and reaction to tinnitus. The second article discusses the continuum of disorders known as “cortical hearing impairment,” supported by a comprehensive summary of clinical presentations. Despite its rarity, an audiologist must understand etiologies of cortical hearing impairment and know how to evaluate and characterize the accompanied hearing difficulty. The third article examines the effects of concussion of the vestibular system and presented an assessment battery for athletes postconcussion and for determining return to play.
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.15
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 8) articles cover a wide range of audiology and public health topics. Konrad-Martin and colleagues promote effective and standardized coding and third payer billing practices for the audiological management of symptomatic ototoxicity. The article includes relevant ICD-10-CM codes and CPT codes. Myers and Dundas provide a review of the effects of noise on the vestibular system. They note that temporary and permanent effects of noise on the vestibular system have been reported and advocate for further investigations to unpack the complex relationship between the auditory and vestibular systems. Finally, Pletnikova and colleagues conducted a quality initiative project to determine the feasibility and reliability of a tablet-based portable audiometer to identify hearing loss in a cognitively impaired population.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 8) articles cover a wide range of audiology and public health research and clinical topics. There are three original research reports and one clinical review. In the first research report, Roman et al. examine the impact of reduced audibility and speaker voice on the mini-mental state examination score in a group of young adults without cognitive impairment. Next, Beamer et al. conduct a preliminary study to investigate the role of a hearing loss prevention education strategies in an active duty military population. Reavis et al. estimate the association between tinnitus and self-reported depression symptoms and between tinnitus and perceived anxiety in a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults. The final article by Henry and Manning is a review article on sound therapy approaches and clinical options for tinnitus management.
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