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Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: The articles in this journal self-study explore research related to various aspects of hearing health and care during the COVID-19 pandemic. Specific topics include: supporting individuals with tinnitus, teaching students about noise-induced hearing loss, and understanding pandemic-related disruptions to hearing abilities and care. Audiologists will take away information they can apply as the pandemic and audiology practice continue to evolve.
Credit(s): PDHs: 6.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.6
Summary: Concussion - or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) - is a unique injury that is different from more severe brain injury, and addressing the associated cognitive deficits requires personalized, targeted interventions These articles discuss research and practical implications for the management of cognitive symptoms of mTBI, including defining the role of the SLP on interdisciplinary management teams, exploring specific assessment and treatment strategies, and emphasizing functional, personalized goals. The articles are from a 2021 American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology forum "Interdisciplinary Management of Concussion or Mild TBI." The articles provide evidence and strategies to increase clinician confidence and effectiveness when working with individuals with concussion or mTBI.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: Even before the COVID-19 pandemic required clinicians to rapidly adapt their practice for remote service provision, researchers were already exploring effective telehealth approaches for audiology. The articles in this journal self-study (selected from a special issue of the American Journal of Audiology, “4th International Meeting on Internet and Audiology”) examine teleaudiology tools and methodologies for hearing screenings, home-based auditory assessment for people who use cochlear implants, assessing hearing aid outcomes using ecological momentary assessment (EMA), and a tool for evaluating hearing aid performance.
Credit(s): PDHs: 6.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.65
Summary: This journal self-study course explores best practices for dysphasia assessment and recent innovations in dysphagia treatment. The articles – from an American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology special issue “Select Papers From the 2018 Charleston Swallowing Conference at Northwestern University” – will help SLPs develop a deeper understanding of how to select appropriate treatment techniques, as well as why those techniques can be impactful in improving swallowing function. The articles delve deeply into past, current, and future treatment approaches for dysphagia and will be helpful for established clinicians as well as those who are new to the field of dysphagia assessment and treatment.
Credit(s): PDHs: 7.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.7
Summary: SLPs are working with an increasing number of children and families who identify as bilingual, multilingual, or dual language learners (DLLs). This journal self-study explores how family expectations can impact the effectiveness of interventions, how expectations may vary across cultures, and what SLP interventions are considered evidence-based when working with DLLs and culturally and linguistically diverse families.
Credit(s): PDHs: 11.5, ASHA CEUs*: 1.15
Summary: This journal self-study course is composed of papers from the 7th Aging and Speech Communication Conference (April 2019). The articles cover a range of topics about speech processing in normal aging, including changes in auditory pathways and cortical structures in older adults with and without hearing loss; the relationship between cognitive skills and hearing performance in older adults; speech perception of older and younger adults when certain linguistic factors are manipulated; and age-related effects of processing accented speech in native and non-native speakers.
Credit(s): PDHs: 8.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.8
Summary: This journal self-study course is composed of papers from the Research Symposium at the 2018 ASHA Convention. The articles summarize much of the accumulating evidence regarding neurological change in post-stroke aphasia recovery. The range of topics covered in this self-study include neurological recovery patterns according to phase of recovery and treatment target (e.g., word vs. sentence), neurological and genetic factors that influence recovery, and methodological considerations to increase validity of findings. These articles will appeal to researchers and clinicians looking for current evidence on dependent neuroplasticity after stroke.
Credit(s): PDHs: 7.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.75
Summary: This journal self-study course is composed of papers from a 2019 Research Forum, Advancing Statistical Methods in Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences. These selected articles provide advanced-level discussion about clinically relevant statistical methodologies to give audiologists a strong foundation from which to analyze and understand the statistical research they come across to decide when and how to apply it in practice. The articles examine frequential and Bayesian statistical methods as well as propensity scores and linear-mixed model analyses.
Credit(s): PDHs: 9.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.9
Summary: This journal self-study course is composed of papers from a 2019 Research Forum, Advancing Statistical Methods in Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences. These selected articles provide advanced-level discussion about clinically relevant statistical methodologies to give speech-language pathologists a stronger foundation from which to analyze and understand the statistical research they come across to decide when and how to apply it in practice.
Credit(s): PDHs: 9.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.95
Summary: This journal self-study includes select papers that were presented at the 2017 Clinical Aphasiology Conference in Snowbird, Utah. The articles reflect the wide array of topics presented on aphasia treatment, tools, and outcomes. Also included is an article that ties ideas from the conference keynote to research in communication disorders. Clinicians can expand their knowledge by learning about the current state of aphasia research.