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Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: This journal self-study updates clinicians on advances in the field that can refine current diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). Two articles address assessment: One examines how type of stimuli can affect differential diagnosis of CAS, and the other identifies possible red flags in young children by examining characteristics of speech production in infants and toddlers who were later diagnosed with CAS. Two additional articles address advances in intervention for CAS: One looks at the efficacy of adding prosody as a treatment component, and the other explores a model-based treatment protocol.
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.15
Summary: Clinical decisions regarding infant feeding not only affect nutritional status but also respiratory function in medically fragile populations. The articles in this journal self-study examine products designed to promote safe infant feeding and sucking patterns. Importantly, they compare and contrast products so that clinicians are equipped to make informed decisions that do not rely on marketing claims. The first two articles focus on bottle nipple characteristics that promote safe milk ingestion and respiratory effects and the third examines a range of pacifiers to determine which characteristics promote the most productive non-nutritive sucking pattern.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: The articles included in this journal self-study include evidence-based assessment and intervention practices for children with cleft lip and/or palate, a specialized population with which many SLPs have limited experience. The first article describes a clinical measure for quantifying nasal air emission using a nasal accelerometer. The second article illustrates the developmental timeline of typical velopharyngeal function in speech production and then compares it to what is seen in toddlers with repaired cleft. The third article offers treatment efficacy data for a naturalistic intervention with phonological emphasis for toddlers with cleft lip and/or palate. The final article examines a number of factors that can influence language development in internationally adopted children with cleft lip and/or palate.