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Credit(s): PDHs: 1.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.15
Summary: This Perspectives activity highlights two articles with objective measures for both evaluation and treatment of velopharyngeal dysfunction. The first article discusses the palatal closure efficiency (PaCE) index. This is an aerodynamic tool used to estimate the velopharyngeal opening during certain speech contexts. This is done by measuring a percentage of change between nasal and oral cognates of an individual. The second article describes the nasometer in depth, highlighting its use as an evaluation and treatment tool for decreasing hypernasality. It goes into further detail on the differences between hypernasality and measured nasalance, highlighting both strengths and limitations of the nasalance score.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 5) articles focus on the functional problems caused by the structural anomalies of the craniofacial complex and pathways for intervention. Articles describes the impact of submucous cleft palate, dental/skeletal anomalies, and distraction osteogenesis on speech and resonance outcomes for individuals with craniofacial anomalies. Multidisciplinary roles and best practice recommendations are also provided.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: These articles explore how the international world of speech-language pathology and audiology is expanding, and, with it, are opportunities to practice, share, and provide education around the world. The articles discuss sharing resources between speech-language pathologists and audiologists, regardless of practice setting.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 5) articles focus on the status of academic and clinical training related to cleft and craniofacial conditions, a module training series for addressing the gaps in current educational roadmaps, and resources and best practice recommendations are provided.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 17) articles present a collaborative initiative of the Committee of International Representatives of the International Cluttering Association. Reichel et al., discuss the initiative that began with the Inaugural Joint World Congress in Japan in 2018. Van Zaalen and Reichel present and discuss the auditory-visual feedback training methodology. Gosselin and Ward affirm that cluttering is a fluency disorder that is mainly characterized by an abnormally rapid or irregular rate of speech. Their pilot study expanded the evidence base by using a Stroop Task to investigate attention performance in people with cluttering. Hilda S√łnsterud discuss the term working alliance as an important concept in cluttering and stuttering therapy and describe the degree to which the therapy dyad is engaged in collaborative, purposive work.