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Presenter(s): Rivka Bornstein, AuD, CCC-A; Kristi D'Auria, AuD, CCC-A; Jessica L Hoffman, AuD, CCC-A
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: Audiologists and SLPs encounter individuals of all ages with varying degrees of hearing loss, many of whom utilize or could benefit from cochlear implants (CI). CI technology has evolved drastically over the past 40 years. This recorded session from the ASHA Audiology 2022 Online Conference discusses the history of and current trends in cochlear implantation, including introduction to the 60/60 Guideline and 20/20 Hearing Initiative.
Presenter(s): Kristi D'Auria, AuD, CCC-A; Rivka Bornstein, AuD, CCC-A; Jessica L Hoffman, AuD, CCC-A
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: In clinical and educational settings, audiologists and SLPs are encountering individuals of all ages with single-sided deafness (SSD) or asymmetric hearing loss (AHL). This recorded session from the ASHA Audiology 2022 Online Conference discusses the prevalence of these cases and explores new trends in cochlear implant (CI) candidacy, available interventions, and outcomes for these populations. 
Presenter(s): Emily R. Doll, MA, MS, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.15
Summary: This session explores effective techniques and resources to help children with selective mutism (SM), an anxiety-based disorder that significantly impacts a child's ability to speak in certain contexts, make progress in school and beyond. The speaker reviews myths and facts about SM and explores the SLP's role in working with children with this disorder. The session includes assessment tips, evidence-based treatment strategies, and ways to support carryover of skills to other contexts and with caregivers and school staff.
Presenter(s): Margaret Kenna; Amanda M Griffin; Charlotte Morse-Fortier; Kelly N Jahn; David Faller; Julie Gayle Arenberg; Michael A Cohen; Elizabeth DesRoche
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: There is evidence that many factors contribute to the varied performance outcomes among pediatric cochlear implant (CI) recipients, including etiology and quality of the electrode neuron interfaces (ENI). This course examines a study that investigated the intersection of these factors by analyzing the records and device settings for 156 children with confirmed diagnoses of either enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA) or Connexin-26 mutations.
Presenter(s): Georgia Cambridge; Tracey Taylor; Wayne Wilson; Wendy Arnott
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: This course presents a systematic review that aimed to answer the PICO-format clinical research question: For adults with cochlear implants and severe to profound postlingual sensorineural hearing loss, is auditory training effective in improving listening outcomes?
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: This Perspectives activity contains three articles, all with emphasis on social considerations in the elderly, with emphases on risk factors for dementia and treatment of Parkinson’s Disease. The first article seeks to describe the validity and reliability of the Fun and Social Engagement Evaluation (FUSE). The authors explain that this is an important topic because lack of physical activity and low social engagement are risk factors for dementia and could impact the rate of decline associated with dementia. Furthermore, physical inactivity has been identified by the World Health Organization as a leading risk factor for global mortality. Nursing home residents were evaluated using the FUSE during “Bingocize” sessions; the program combines a bingo-like game and physical activity and is scaled for differing cognitive and physical levels of ability. Results indicate that the FUSE is a valid and reliable method to measure engagement, and this is important because this measure can be recommended to nursing homes to measure engagement, as well as used in future research. The second article attempts to determine which of a variety of factors were associated with communicative participation and measured this based on the social network size of an individual. The author feels that this is important because social isolation is linked to cognitive decline and depression, both of which are risk factors for developing dementia. This study builds on previous research related to social participation and communication as predictors of successful health outcomes. Two research questions are addressed: What numbers of communication partners exist in the self-reported social network of older adults? And what factors are included in a model for predicting the social network size of older adults? They studied 337 seniors in Central Arkansas by collecting interviews and conducting standardized assessments. Results indicate that cognition and education are factors that are related to communicative participation. The results of this study, along with additional literature on this topic, suggest that there is benefit in recognizing a decrease in communicative participation and the role that cognitive decline may play in restricting communicative participation. The final article describes the program developed at Long Island University Brooklyn, which is multidisciplinary in nature, in contrast to previous treatment models which have traditionally focused on a monodisciplinary approach. In the past decade, there has been a shift from monodisciplinary models and research to a multidisciplinary approach, which is more effective in holistically treating the multifaceted effects of Parkinson’s Disease (PD), resulting in better outcomes and social participation for individuals with PD. The article describes use of the Fitness for PD exercise program twice per week for ten weeks, targeting strength, balance, agility, stretching, and aerobic exercises. Students at the university are engaged in taking vitals, facilitating resistance training, and enhancing safety; students and participants find benefit in working together. One hour Speech Clinic for PD sessions are conducted after each fitness class, including voice evaluations and therapy focusing on maximizing voice production and improving breathing patterns. The first half of sessions are conducted in game format, which encourages interpersonal interactions and collaboration and facilitates carryover into conversational contexts. Sessions incorporate Motor Learning Principles, LSVT LOUD, and respiratory exercises. The second half of sessions are conducted in whole-group format and speech practice in small groups.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: The theme for this Perspectives activity is clinical considerations in assessment of children and adults from culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) backgrounds and providing culturally supporting treatment settings. Topics include (a) acoustic parameters of retroflex sounds, (b) the two-question method for assessing gender identity, (c) assessment recommendations for new language learners, and (d) creating culturally supportive settings to foster literacy development.
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: These SIG 2 articles focus on clinical assessment and practices for individuals with aphasia. Topics covered included challenges associated with diagnosing primary progressive aphasia (PPA) and the impact of adaptive yoga programs for persons with aphasia. First, Aimee Dietz, E. Susan Duncan, Lauren Bislick, Sarah Stegman, Jenna Collins, Chitrali Mamlekar, Rachel Gleason, and Michael J. McCarthy provide an overview of the potential impact adapted yoga programs can have for people with stroke-induced aphasia. Second, Adithya Chandregowda raises awareness about the challenges associated with encountering primary progressive aphasia (PPA) patients in the acute hospital setting.
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.15
Summary: This Perspectives activity highlights two articles with objective measures for both evaluation and treatment of velopharyngeal dysfunction. The first article discusses the palatal closure efficiency (PaCE) index. This is an aerodynamic tool used to estimate the velopharyngeal opening during certain speech contexts. This is done by measuring a percentage of change between nasal and oral cognates of an individual. The second article describes the nasometer in depth, highlighting its use as an evaluation and treatment tool for decreasing hypernasality. It goes into further detail on the differences between hypernasality and measured nasalance, highlighting both strengths and limitations of the nasalance score.
Presenter(s): Christine Sapienza, PhD, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: Behavioral interventions that provide a calibrated mode for strengthening inspiratory and expiratory muscles are limited and often non-evidence-based. This on demand webinar discusses the evidence base for respiratory muscle strength training (RMST) devices and shares the assessment and treatment protocols necessary for valid implementation of respiratory muscle strength training protocols. The course will be useful for SLPs working in health care settings treating acute and chronic conditions that impact the functions of breathing, coughing, swallowing, and vocalizing that result from skeletal muscle weakness.
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