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Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: The articles in this journal self-study explore research related to various aspects of hearing health and care during the COVID-19 pandemic. Specific topics include: supporting individuals with tinnitus, teaching students about noise-induced hearing loss, and understanding pandemic-related disruptions to hearing abilities and care. Audiologists will take away information they can apply as the pandemic and audiology practice continue to evolve.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: Even before the COVID-19 pandemic required clinicians to rapidly adapt their practice for remote service provision, researchers were already exploring effective telehealth approaches for audiology. The articles in this journal self-study (selected from a special issue of the American Journal of Audiology, “4th International Meeting on Internet and Audiology”) examine teleaudiology tools and methodologies for hearing screenings, home-based auditory assessment for people who use cochlear implants, assessing hearing aid outcomes using ecological momentary assessment (EMA), and a tool for evaluating hearing aid performance.
Credit(s): PDHs: 7.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.75
Summary: This journal self-study course is composed of papers from a 2019 Research Forum, Advancing Statistical Methods in Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences. These selected articles provide advanced-level discussion about clinically relevant statistical methodologies to give audiologists a strong foundation from which to analyze and understand the statistical research they come across to decide when and how to apply it in practice. The articles examine frequential and Bayesian statistical methods as well as propensity scores and linear-mixed model analyses.
Credit(s): PDHs: 9.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.9
Summary: This journal self-study course is composed of papers from a 2019 Research Forum, Advancing Statistical Methods in Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences. These selected articles provide advanced-level discussion about clinically relevant statistical methodologies to give speech-language pathologists a stronger foundation from which to analyze and understand the statistical research they come across to decide when and how to apply it in practice.