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Credit(s): PDHs: 7.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.75
Summary: This journal self-study course is composed of papers from a 2019 Research Forum, Advancing Statistical Methods in Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences. These selected articles provide advanced-level discussion about clinically relevant statistical methodologies to give audiologists a strong foundation from which to analyze and understand the statistical research they come across to decide when and how to apply it in practice. The articles examine frequential and Bayesian statistical methods as well as propensity scores and linear-mixed model analyses.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: This self-study features highly read and cited audiology research articles published in 2018 in ASHA’s scholarly journals. Topics reflect the diversity of the field and include: (1) what users need to know to effectively manage hearing aids, (2) how language skills develop in children with cochlear implants, and (3) information available on social media about tinnitus.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: This self-study includes work presented at the Third International Meeting on Internet and Audiology. The articles discuss innovations in audiology, with a focus on teleaudiology and eHealth services. Readers will learn about Internet programs and smartphone applications that assist with the management of hearing and hearing-related issues, as well as how data collected through these means may influence public policy.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: Despite best practices, many clients eventually discontinue using their hearing aids. Though a number of reasons may explain this behavior, declining patient satisfaction is perhaps one of the most significant. The articles in this journal self-study explore ways to improve hearing aid outcomes by targeting patient satisfaction through increased self-efficacy. The first article establishes an overall framework for client satisfaction by identifying essential concepts underlying hearing aid management. The second article describes a new area of research regarding self-fitting, which promotes self-efficacy by involving clients in adjusting their own hearing aids from day 1. The third article examines psychosocial benefits and improved satisfaction resulting from hearing aid trials. The final article empirically tests the connection between self-efficacy of specific management skills and hearing aid satisfaction.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: As people age, they often experience a variety of health-related issues, including hearing loss and memory difficulties. This journal self-study explores the relationship between hearing loss and cognitive functioning and considers what is known about age-related cognitive decline and how it may be influenced by hearing loss and the use of amplification. As the primary provider of hearing-related services for older adults, audiologists are in a position to address cognitive issues and assist patients and families. This journal course discusses strategies on how to do so effectively.