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Results 21 - 30 of 79
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: It is well known within our field that identifying voice and upper airway specialized training opportunities and subsequent positions is challenging, competitive, and sometimes elusive. In this SIG 3 activity, various pathways to specializing in voice and upper airway disorders are explored from the viewpoint of different authors at various stages of their careers. The hope is to make the process of specialization more transparent and share components that have contributed to success, while also highlighting the diversity of training and experience that is so important in our field.
Presenter(s): Emily R. Doll, MA, MS, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.15
Summary: This session explores effective techniques and resources to help children with selective mutism (SM), an anxiety-based disorder that significantly impacts a child's ability to speak in certain contexts, make progress in school and beyond. The speaker reviews myths and facts about SM and explores the SLP's role in working with children with this disorder. The session includes assessment tips, evidence-based treatment strategies, and ways to support carryover of skills to other contexts and with caregivers and school staff.
Presenter(s): Marianne E Gellert-Jones, MA, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: This on demand webinar is designed for school-based SLPs who support children with complex oral feeding and swallowing needs. The speaker discusses the components of a robust feeding and dysphagia assessment, and how that assessment informs treatment decisions surrounding a student's feeding needs. The course examines effective and realistic goal development to address feeding needs within the IEP.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: This SIG 5 activity analyzes the relationship between the opioid crisis and cleft lip and palate care across the life span. Two main themes of prevention and treatment after exposure are explained. The articles outline alternatives to opioid use after cleft-related surgeries, impacts on infants and children who were exposed in utero, and velopharyngeal insufficiency treatment after substance abuse.
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: In this series of SIG 3 articles, a foundation for laryngeal endoscopic imaging and interpreting videostroboscopic parameters is provided. These concepts are then put into practice in the context of three case studies focused on muscle tension dysphonia, bilateral vocal fold lesions, and vocal fold immobility. In the cases, auditory perceptual analysis, acoustic and aerodynamic measures, and candidacy for voice therapy are assessed in addition to videostroboscopic parameters. Video and audio examples are included to provide an interactive experience for the reader.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: The first two articles in this SIG 19 activity provide information to better our assessment and treatment of individuals in the area of voice, while the latter two articles focus on treatment of individuals in the area of speech production. The authors for all four articles present a review of the literature as well as challenges and future directions. First, Van Hook and Duffy conducted a pilot study to trial the Gender Spectrum Voice Inventory. This article provides a review, discussion of validity, and speech-language pathologists’ perceptions of the inventory in an effort to address a gap in available clinical tools for transgender and nonbinary people. Next, Hammer reviews the relationship between air flow with sound pressure level during syllable production while holding fundamental frequency and subglottic air pressure constant. The results have clinical implications that stress the importance of an increase in air flow and focus on vocal fold contact. Then, Gritsyk et al. describe their study to determine which measures of somatosensory acuity best predicted change in production accuracy during vowel learning tasks while controlling auditory acuity. Results indicate only bite block adaptation with auditory masking was significantly associated with performance. Finally, Zajac et al. discuss their preliminary study that indicated cleft type contributes to production errors, specifically backing, in children with repaired cleft palate. Additionally, a history of otitis media affects the spectral contrast of alveolar consonants in children without clefts.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: This Perspectives course contains three articles that focus on social considerations in the elderly, with emphases on risk factors for dementia and treatment of Parkinson’s disease.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: The theme for this Perspectives course is clinical considerations in assessment of children and adults from culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) backgrounds and providing culturally supporting treatment settings. Topics include (a) acoustic parameters of retroflex sounds, (b) the two-question method for assessing gender identity, (c) assessment recommendations for new language learners, and (d) creating culturally supportive settings to foster literacy development.
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: These SIG 2 articles focus on clinical assessment and practices for individuals with aphasia. Topics covered included challenges associated with diagnosing primary progressive aphasia (PPA) and the impact of adaptive yoga programs for persons with aphasia. First, Aimee Dietz, E. Susan Duncan, Lauren Bislick, Sarah Stegman, Jenna Collins, Chitrali Mamlekar, Rachel Gleason, and Michael J. McCarthy provide an overview of the potential impact adapted yoga programs can have for people with stroke-induced aphasia. Second, Adithya Chandregowda raises awareness about the challenges associated with encountering primary progressive aphasia (PPA) patients in the acute hospital setting.
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.15
Summary: This Perspectives activity highlights two articles with objective measures for both evaluation and treatment of velopharyngeal dysfunction. The first article discusses the palatal closure efficiency (PaCE) index. This is an aerodynamic tool used to estimate the velopharyngeal opening during certain speech contexts. This is done by measuring a percentage of change between nasal and oral cognates of an individual. The second article describes the nasometer in depth, highlighting its use as an evaluation and treatment tool for decreasing hypernasality. It goes into further detail on the differences between hypernasality and measured nasalance, highlighting both strengths and limitations of the nasalance score.
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