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Instructional Level
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.55
Summary: The articles in this journal self-study discuss the literacy difficulties many children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) experience, with direct clinical implications for literacy assessment and intervention. The articles, which apply to children across the age spectrum, are from a 2021 forum published in Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, titled “Literacy in Autism—Across the Spectrum.”
Credit(s): PDHs: 7.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.7
Summary: This journal self-study course highlights various instructional strategies that demonstrate positive progress for students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The findings and recommendations can assist SLPs in choosing strategies that produce targeted outcomes for students with ASD on their caseload.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: This self-study is composed of research presented at the 2017 ASHA Convention Research Symposium, “Advances in Autism Research: From Learning Mechanisms to Novel Interventions.” These journal articles – published as part of a 2018 research forum in the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research – explore the clinical implications of current research on SLPs’ work with children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Specific topics include ways to personalize intervention, the interaction between language and executive functioning, how a child’s ability to interact differently with their environment impacts communication, and factors that may influence the development of shape bias, which is an important factor in vocabulary development.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.55
Summary: Communication disorders in children may affect social interactions and lead to negative emotional and behavioral outcomes. This journal self-study explores well-being, resilience, and emotional competence in school-age children. The articles discuss ways to identify risk factors to emotional well-being (including victimization and bullying), assess emotional competence, and support emotional expression in children who use AAC. The final article explores counseling and the role the SLP plays in addressing emotional issues as a part of intervention.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: This journal self-study explores issues related to service provision for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) by taking learners through the typical intervention process. The course starts with a review of speech sound assessments for children with ASD, an area that is not as commonly addressed in this population as other areas of communication. It then moves to how documentation of assessment results can be improved by adopting a strengths-based approach. A discussion of how SLPs in the U.S. and Taiwan use evidence-based interventions for ASD follows. And the course concludes with a discussion of an innovative way to approach social skills and friendships for children with ASD. Each article includes specific recommendations that clinicians can incorporate immediately into practice to improve all aspects of service provision for children with ASD.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: Feeding and swallowing problems in children take many forms and are often intertwined with other aspects of a child’s development. This journal self-study explores some of these interactions, including the relationship between feeding and swallowing disorders and language impairment, as well as connections between hearing and feeding/ swallowing. The self-study also includes information on how mealtime duration relates to severity of feeding and swallowing problems in children with cerebral palsy, as well as how a family-centered intervention can address mealtime behaviors in children with autism spectrum disorder. Clinicians will be able to immediately apply the information in these articles to improve management of pediatric feeding and swallowing disorders.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: While the definition of executive function (EF) varies in the literature, it includes, at its core, the skills people use to plan, organize, problem-solve, and set and achieve goals in their daily lives. EF skills start developing in early childhood, and children with EF dysfunction experience social and academic difficulties. This journal self-study explores issues related to the development of EF skills as well as principles and practical strategies for EF assessment and intervention in preschool and school-age children. It also presents an argument for the role of EF in social communication and discusses ways that SLPs can address these skills in treatment. SLPs working with children with EF deficits can use this information to improve assessment techniques and plan intervention strategies to better meet the needs of these children.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: As caseloads grow and diversify, clinicians may question whether they are equipped with the necessary tools to address changing demands when it comes to working with children with speech sound disorders. The single-word naming task is a basic component of pediatric speech production assessment, but is there an adequate evidence base behind the use of single-word naming tools for all populations served? Are the items found in these assessments necessary and sufficient to diagnose speech sound disorders? The four articles in this journal self-study address such questions.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: Clinicians who work with children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are aware of the challenges presented by the varied abilities and behaviors of this group. This journal self-study focuses on special populations of children with ASD, including those who are deaf, those who use AAC, and bilingual children. A final article discusses how intervention can be extended beyond improving social skills to working toward establishing and maintaining actual friendships. SLPs working with children with ASD can use information from these articles to improve clinical practice when working with children with these particular special situations.