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Results 61 - 70 of 73
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: The theme for this SIG 14 activity is clinical considerations through paradigm shifts in providing culturally relevant family-centered intervention and instruction. Topics include (a) providing culturally relevant family centered care; (b) second language literacy instruction for multilingual adolescents; and (c) impacts of study abroad experiences on students’ intercultural competence.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: These SIG 12 Perspectives articles provide information on current issues associated with visual processing of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) displays for people with traumatic brain injury, assessment of the expressive language abilities of Spanish-speaking children who rely on AAC, and culturally sensitive approaches to aided language modeling. Readers will be more adept at designing effective AAC displays for adults with traumatic brain injury and at providing AAC services to children from multilingual and multicultural backgrounds.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: The theme for this SIG 14 activity is bilingual parents’ experiences receiving advice regarding language use and perspectives related to multicultural training with SLPs. Topics include: examining the advice parents of bilingual children received from health care professionals and teachers regarding the language(s) their children should learn and use, as well as assessing whether SLPs feel adequately prepared to interact with, assess, instruct, or treat multicultural clients.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: Three clinical practice considerations are reviewed within this course, including communication with patients/families in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic, identification of word finding errors in normally aging individuals, and how to address severe tinnitus.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: Pedagogical practices in communication sciences and disorders have grown thanks in part to innovative techniques from other fields. The articles in this activity each present models that can be successfully incorporated into our discipline. Slavych describes models of backward course design—course development that starts by focusing on learning outcomes before considering content or teaching methods. Squires and Squires introduce best–worst scaling, a method for examining group preferences, and reported on how it can inform admissions practices. Speights Atkins et al. describe models of mentoring undergraduate research experiences and their applications in two communication sciences and disorders research labs. Finally, Perryman et al. examine the effects of a mixed-reality simulation in which actors playing parents interacted through computer avatars with undergraduate students carrying out clinical procedures.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: This trio of SIG 9 articles provides the reader with three diversely focused topics related to pediatric hearing and hearing disorders. These range from a review of barriers to equity in pediatric hearing health care, to students’ perspectives on preservice education about cued speech, and then how practitioners measure receptive and expressive American Sign Language (ASL). The review, “Barriers to Equity in Pediatric Hearing Health Care: A Review of the Evidence,” explores data to suggest that hearing health care disparities constitute a major factor in loss to follow-up or documentation for children going through the Early Hearing Detection and Intervention process. Underlying disparities are multifactorial and result in delayed care and suboptimal developmental outcomes for children who are deaf or hard of hearing. “ASL Assessment in Practice: Assessing American Sign Language Across Clinical Settings” discusses exploratory research to investigate what assessment tools professionals use in measuring receptive and expressive ASL. Conclusions indicate that there is variable access and knowledge for appropriate assessment measures in ASL. “The Effect of a Graduate Course in Cued Speech on Students' Perspectives: A Pilot Study” is a pilot study investigating the beliefs and attitudes in Deaf Education related to a course on cued speech. The investigation revealed that a single course in the approach could influence student perspectives on cued speech and other Deaf Education instructional approaches.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: In this series of articles, the need for clear guidelines in graduate education on the topic of transgender voice and communication is explored through an e-survey. Considerations for culturally competent voice care is presented in the context of two case studies. Case studies are also used to highlight the importance of an interdisciplinary gender affirming approach for successful voice care with adolescence. In the final article, a voice technique is adapted for voice masculinization.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: The articles included here examine the current state of education of three topics within our discipline. DeJarnette and Wegner report on the classroom and clinical training that graduate students in speech-language pathology receive in augmentative and alternative communication. Domholdt and Billings identify associations and disconnects within graduate programs’ interests and practices in teaching population health concepts—that is, clinical care regarding communities and large systems. Finally, Tucker et al. examine practicing audiologists’ and speech-language pathologists’ interests in obtaining a research-based PhD in communication sciences and disorders and barriers to starting and completing a doctoral program.
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This activity has two articles with different foci. The misophonia case study is a contribution to the evidence base for use of sound therapy and coping strategies in treating and managing misophonia. It also shares available tools for diagnosing misophonia. The study about using learning applications in intervention for children with hearing loss shares results of a speech-language pathologists' focus group. The focus group centered on using speech and language application features, benefits, and concerns in school-based service delivery
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: These three articles describe current issues and advances related to hearing diagnostics, treatment, and prevention. The first article is a detailed description of the impact that COVID-19 face masks and social distancing regulations have had on speech recognition and how face masks affect the acoustic signal and increase cognitive effort in listeners with hearing loss. Suggestions for mitigating these deleterious impacts on communication are provided. The second article is a research study examining the correlation between self-perceived hearing difficulty, determined using a questionnaire (Adult Auditory Performance Scale), and speech-in-noise performance (Listening in Spatialized Noise–Sentences Test) in listeners with normal pure-tone thresholds. Results highlight the relationship between self-perceived hearing abilities and binaural speech-in-noise performance supporting the inclusion of speech-in-noise testing even in those with normal pure-tone thresholds. The third article is a review of current genetic, stem cell, and pharmacotherapy research for treatment and prevention of hearing loss. Animal models are discussed, as well as steps to translate this research into clinical practice.
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