ASHA Learning Pass

Log in and check out the Dashboard to view featured courses.

Filter Courses By
Experience
Instructional Level
Results 71 - 80 of 297
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: The theme for this SIG 14 activity is clinical considerations through paradigm shifts in providing culturally relevant family-centered intervention and instruction. Topics include (a) providing culturally relevant family centered care; (b) second language literacy instruction for multilingual adolescents; and (c) impacts of study abroad experiences on students’ intercultural competence.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.25
Summary: In “Coupling Hearing Health With Community-Based Group Therapy for Cognitive Health in Low-Income African American Elders,” Postman et al. describe a community-based group intervention to address disparities experienced by African American elders in the early stages of cognitive–communicative decline. The intervention included partnerships with community health centers, culturally informed activities, and ongoing input from staff and participants. The authors describe the advantages of this community-engaged approach, as well as the benefits of joining hearing and cognition for minimizing access barriers. In “Public Health Frameworks in Audiology Education: Rationale and Model for Implementation,” Warren and Levy review how public health education can advance the field of audiology, particularly through coursework and dual degree programs. The authors also describe two frameworks for public health training in an audiology academic setting and identify the competencies that overlap in audiology and public health, helping to illustrate the relevance of public health education in addressing objectives in hearing health care.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: These SIG Special Topics articles provide guidance to current and future researchers in communication sciences and disorders about how to maximize the clinical impact of their research. Utianski et al. describe clinical practice research and the current barriers to it, while highlighting initiatives researchers can take advantage of. Douglas et al. define knowledge brokering and outline the roles of organizations and individuals who take on that job. Then, Davidson and colleagues offer researchers concrete steps for using social media to enhance impact. Finally, Nicholson and Smith review both traditional science impact metrics and alternative metrics and offer concrete recommendations for documenting clinical impact for use in one’s CV or career advancement materials.
Presenter(s): Neil Wright, AuD, F-AAA; Joseph Hribar, AuD
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: Streamed audio has grown from a technological novelty into a distinct listening environment for hearing aid users. This presents a unique listening environment that can prove difficult to verify, as streamed audio is not an external stimulus and cannot be verified using conventional methods. This session describes a new and accessible verification method aimed at the streamed audio environment, ensuring that hearing aid users receive optimal benefit in their digital soundscape.
Presenter(s): De Wet Swanepoel; Karina De Sousa
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: This course discusses validated technologies for remote hearing screening in the digital age, including options for no-touch screening with uncalibrated equipment and low-touch remote screening. The course is part of a set of practical programs that address specific aspects of remote practice in audiology.
Presenter(s): Soumya Venkitakrishnan; Yu-Hsiang Wu; Nicholas P Giuliani
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: Individuals with hearing loss experience negative psychosocial consequences such as distress, depression, and loneliness. If they also experience excessive negative emotional responses (i.e., confusion, frustration, anger) or reduced positive emotional responses (i.e., happiness) compared to listeners with normal hearing, they might be unmotivated to approach communication situations. This course describes a study whose purpose was to determine the feasibility of using facial expressions to measure emotional responses.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: This collection of SIG 13 articles addresses popular topics in dysphagia care throughout the life span regarding thickening practices, family-centered care, and early intervention. Jane Mertz Garcia, Edgar Chambers IV, and Anna Boyer utilized a survey to re-examine practice patterns for thickened liquids and provided a comparison of past practices with current to provide insight into contemporary themes that have previously not been considered. Doreen Benson and George Barnes explore the utility of a mathematical prediction model (Bayes theorem) in dysphagia management. Samantha E. Shune, Deanna Linville, and Ashwini Namasivayam-MacDonald address maximizing treatment effectiveness by using an approach with family resiliency and adaptation. Drawing from the principles of family systems theory and the biopsychosocial-spiritual framework, they use a case study as a tutorial to explore the application of family-centered care models to dysphagia management. Stephanie C. Cohen and Karen Dilfer focus on the definition of pediatric feeding disorder (PFD) and the multifaceted needs of families and children in early intervention, support for use of responsive feeding in treatment of PFD, alignment of responsive feeding strategies with early intervention principles, and barriers limiting access to consistent, high-quality early intervention services for children with PFD.
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: In this series of SIG 3 articles, a foundation for laryngeal endoscopic imaging and interpreting videostroboscopic parameters is provided. These concepts are then put into practice in the context of three case studies focused on muscle tension dysphonia, bilateral vocal fold lesions, and vocal fold immobility. In the cases, auditory perceptual analysis, acoustic and aerodynamic measures, and candidacy for voice therapy are assessed in addition to videostroboscopic parameters. Video and audio examples are included to provide an interactive experience for the reader.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: This SIG 13 collection of astute articles provides information regarding managing and treating dysphagia in the hospital for both adult and pediatric patients. Nalia GurgelJuarez and colleagues explore the frequency of oral care based on staff adherence to oral care policies. Rebecca Smith et al. investigate the quality-of-life impacts of dysphagia and its interventions on mealtimes using the Swallowing Quality of Life Questionnaire and the Eating Assessment Tool. Jessica L. Rice and Maureen A. LeftonGreif review high-flow nasal cannula mechanisms of action, its use in specific populations and settings, and what is known about initiation of feeding during this therapy. Finally, Donna Edwards and colleagues explore the impact of COVID-19 on modifications in clinical practice related to pediatric feeding disorders and dysphagia via telehealth.
Presenter(s): Jill E Senner, PhD, CCC-SLP; Gloria Soto, PhD; Matthew R Baud, MS, CCC-SLP; Carole Zangari, PhD, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This recorded dialogue features three AAC experts, who discuss person- and family-centered approaches to AAC, focusing on effective, culturally and linguistically responsive assessment practices. The exchange was recorded at the 2021 online conference "Expanding AAC: Accessible Strategies for Functional Communication" and is a companion to two recorded sessions from the conference: Effective Practices in AAC Assessment (Jill E. Senner, PhD, CCC-SLP, and Matthew R. Baud, MS, CCC-SLP) and A Culturally and Linguistically Responsive Approach to AAC (Gloria Soto, PhD). The dialogue was moderated by Carole Zangari, PhD, CCC-SLP.
<< 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 >>