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Presenter(s): Suzanne M. Adlof, PhD
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: Dyslexia and developmental language disorders (DLD) – relatively common, language-based disorders that affect children’s reading and academic achievement as well as social and life outcomes – frequently co-occur in the same child. This session examines the differences between the two disorders, how to identify children at risk for either or both, and how to provide treatment and accommodations to promote positive outcomes. The speaker discusses evidence-based practices for assessing and treating reading difficulties.
Presenter(s): Kimberly Murza, PhD, CCC-SLP
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: In order to best serve adolescent students transitioning to post-secondary settings, SLPs have to keep the end in mind. What are students’ college and/or career goals and how can we use current research on what employers want and what entry-level college courses expect to best prepare them for their future? In this session, the speaker discusses tools to modify intervention plans to incorporate current evidence in neurodiversity and self-determination theory as well as strategies for collaboration with a focus on student strengths.
Presenter(s): Melissa Malani, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-CL
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: This session examines the difference between disciplinary literacy and content-area literacy and takes an in-depth look at the various intricacies of the disciplines. The speaker shares a thinking-points questionnaire to help SLPs collaborate with content-area teachers and determine students’ language needs.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.55
Summary: The articles in this journal self-study discuss the literacy difficulties many children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) experience, with direct clinical implications for literacy assessment and intervention. The articles, which apply to children across the age spectrum, are from a 2021 forum published in Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, titled “Literacy in Autism—Across the Spectrum.”
Presenter(s): Gayla L. Poling, PhD, CCC-A
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: Hundreds of medications commonly prescribed for anticancer treatments and some infections are known to cause auditory and/or vestibular dysfunction, known as ototoxicity. This course discusses early detection of ototoxicity through increased awareness, leveraging current tools, and clinical practice approaches for serial monitoring, all of which can provide care teams opportunities to identify adverse effects, modify treatment plans to mitigate hearing loss, and utilize individualized interventions. The speaker discusses strategies for preventing or minimizing cochlear damage to preserve quality of life for patients receiving treatment and to reduce the societal burden of hearing loss.
Presenter(s): Dr. O’neil W. Guthrie, MS, PhD, CCC-A
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: Gene therapy offers the promise to correct inherited forms of hearing loss as well as acquired forms such as noise-induced hearing loss, ototoxicity, and presbycusis. However, there are several barriers that must be overcome before such potential can be realized. This course describes the conceptual framework that governs gene therapy today, reveals how this framework has influenced current progress, and discusses a re-imagining of inner ear gene therapy with the goal of achieving outcomes that are clinically relevant and realistic.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.55
Summary: Upon entering into a new school year, this SIG 16 Perspectives activity highlights some of the realities faced by school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and their students. Across all articles, readers will learn of the challenges that are all too often experienced by SLPs and our students, as well as recommendations for how to increase satisfaction with school-based positions, reduce burnout, and increase the mental health, representation, and motivation of our students. In the first article, the authors (Amir, Jones, Frankel, & Fritzch) report survey results that found that although school-based SLPs are satisfied with their relationships with students, they continue to experience challenges, especially related to caseload/workload and others’ misunderstanding of the roles and responsibilities of the SLP. This article is followed by a tutorial from Marante and Farquharson, in which they provide tips to address some of these challenges and reduce feelings of burnout and overwhelm, providing helpful checklists in the appendices. In the remaining three articles, authors outline ways for school-based SLPs to further support our students. The first of these articles, by Hoff and Unger, describes how to collaborate with mental health providers to address some of the unique social-emotional needs of students who stutter. Harris and Owen Van Horne, in the subsequent article, address how to include more diverse materials within therapy sessions so that the lived experiences of all students are more accurately portrayed and represented. Lastly, Abendroth and Whited discuss ways to support older students who are transitioning into adulthood, giving readers several ideas for how to increase students’ motivation, further develop rapport, and provide models of problem solving and resiliency.
Presenter(s): Vickie L. Tuten, AuD, CCC-A, CPS/A; Kathy E. Gates, AuD, CCC-A
Credit(s): PDHs: 0.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.05
Summary: Noise is prevalent in everyday life, and the general population lacks awareness of the risks of hazardous noise exposure and strategies to reduce noise-induced hearing loss. By integrating hearing loss prevention education into patient encounters and taking advantage of outreach/education opportunities, audiologists can help reduce the prevalence of noise-induced hearing loss. This course discusses the why, where, and how of integrating prevention education into your practice.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.3
Summary: The theme for this Perspectives activity is clinical considerations in assessment of children and adults from culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) backgrounds and providing culturally supporting treatment settings. Topics include (a) acoustic parameters of retroflex sounds, (b) the two-question method for assessing gender identity, (c) assessment recommendations for new language learners, and (d) creating culturally supportive settings to foster literacy development.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: This activity is a grouping of studies related to the understanding stuttering throughout the life span. The activity is based on articles related to attentional focus on motor control in people who stutter (PWS) and the relationship to social stress, acoustic measures of emotion in children who stutter, a study of covert stuttering throughout the lifespan, vocational stereotyping of PWS by human resource preprofessionals, and audio-based podcasts to assist in self-help for PWS. Together, these articles investigate important measures in understanding stuttering and how researchers and clinicians can better understand the condition of stuttering.
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