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Results 61 - 70 of 77
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.55
Summary: Spoken and written language skills underlie all aspects of the school curriculum and are essential for school success. This journal self-study, which includes articles from a Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools clinical forum, addresses ways SLPs can assess and treat language disorders within the context of the school curriculum. The goal of the articles is, as noted in the introductory article, “to establish the school-based SLP as the language and literacy expert for curriculum-based interventions and assessment” (Bourque Meaux, 2018, p.138). The authors in the clinical forum discuss alternate service delivery options and tools for school-based SLPs to use and also explore how SLPs can mentor and educate other school professionals to better support language skills within the school curriculum.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.25
Summary: Research into programmed isometric lingual exercise in order to improve swallow function has yielded promising results. This journal self-study examines evidence related to this relatively new therapeutic approach. The first article in this self-study offers a review of the recent literature on isometric lingual tasks across a variety of populations and includes clinical implications based on the findings. The second and third articles are normative studies about adults without diagnosed dysphagia. One explores how tongue strengthening affects mealtime functioning in older, long-term care residents, while the other examines relationships between performance variability, isometric strength, swallowing pressure, age, and gender.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: Clinicians are well-trained in collecting and reporting thorough family and medical case histories of their clients. This information, however, is most often used as a backdrop for direct assessment measures, which are the actual standards for determining eligibility for services. In recent years, the evidence base concerning risk factors for communication disorders has steadily increased. The four articles in this self-study not only demonstrate the significant value of case history information, but suggest that diagnostic standards in the future will weigh risk factors more heavily along with assessment scores.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: As caseloads grow and diversify, clinicians may question whether they are equipped with the necessary tools to address changing demands when it comes to working with children with speech sound disorders. The single-word naming task is a basic component of pediatric speech production assessment, but is there an adequate evidence base behind the use of single-word naming tools for all populations served? Are the items found in these assessments necessary and sufficient to diagnose speech sound disorders? The four articles in this journal self-study address such questions.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.55
Summary: English grammar develops in a fairly predictable sequence, and errors are common as children learn grammar rules. Children with language impairments often demonstrate continued difficulty with grammatical morphemes. This journal self-study explores issues related to grammar development, as well as factors to consider when assessing and treating grammar deficits. Clinicians can use this information to improve intervention and optimize grammar development in children with language disorders.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: School-based clinicians generally agree that /r/ is one of the most challenging speech sounds to remediate. Despite research showing how persistent rhotic distortions can affect students’ social, academic, and even future employment prospects, some children are discharged from services because traditional approaches simply fail to work. This journal self-study offers a response to the frustration often experienced by clinicians and clients struggling with persistent errors by showcasing some exciting new methods in /r/ intervention. Three articles describe promising results of different types of biofeedback-visual-acoustic, ultrasound, and electropalatographic interventions that are gradually becoming more accessible to clinicians. These articles also explore how biofeedback methods and other intervention modifications can adapt the principles of motor learning to increase efficacy of articulation intervention. The fourth article is an exploration of self-entrainment theory to promote speech sound change through the use of hand gestures.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: Stuttering is a complex disorder that can lead to social, emotional, and academic difficulties. Clinicians treating children who stutter must consider many factors during assessment and intervention. The articles in this clinical forum describe approaches to evidence-based practice (EBP) that balance available research with clinical expertise, while also considering the needs and desires of the patient and family. Four fluency experts use case studies to describe how they make decisions about stuttering management for a young child as well as an adolescent. Clinicians can use this information to guide how they incorporate the three components of EBP – research evidence, clinical expertise, and client preferences – into their own practice with children who stutter.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: A communication disorder can have a profound impact on many aspects of a person’s life, including school, work, leisure, and social relationships. Sudden changes, such as those that occur after stroke or other illness, as well as more gradual difficulties, such as those associated with age-related hearing loss, can negatively affect interactions with other people and engagement in daily activities. This journal self-study explores how social networks and feelings of isolation or loneliness may change when a person experiences communication difficulties. It also looks at how well SLPs and audiologists recognize and address the social and emotional needs of their patients during treatment. Clinicians working with older adults with speech, language, and hearing disorders will come away with a better understanding of the impact of social and familial support on patient success and how to better address these needs when planning treatment.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: Clinicians who work with children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are aware of the challenges presented by the varied abilities and behaviors of this group. This journal self-study focuses on special populations of children with ASD, including those who are deaf, those who use AAC, and bilingual children. A final article discusses how intervention can be extended beyond improving social skills to working toward establishing and maintaining actual friendships. SLPs working with children with ASD can use information from these articles to improve clinical practice when working with children with these particular special situations.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.55
Summary: Literacy skills begin to develop in early childhood, and addressing deficits in reading and writing skills early may prevent later problems in school. This journal self-study explores special situations that may affect literacy skills, including the presence of speech sound disorders, hearing impairment, and cultural and/or socioeconomic differences. It also includes articles that discuss intervention techniques to improve phonological awareness, an important emergent literacy skill. Clinicians can use this information to improve reading and writing assessment and treatment techniques for preschool and early elementary school children.
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