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Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: While the definition of executive function (EF) varies in the literature, it includes, at its core, the skills people use to plan, organize, problem-solve, and set and achieve goals in their daily lives. EF skills start developing in early childhood, and children with EF dysfunction experience social and academic difficulties. This journal self-study explores issues related to the development of EF skills as well as principles and practical strategies for EF assessment and intervention in preschool and school-age children. It also presents an argument for the role of EF in social communication and discusses ways that SLPs can address these skills in treatment. SLPs working with children with EF deficits can use this information to improve assessment techniques and plan intervention strategies to better meet the needs of these children.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.55
Summary: English grammar develops in a fairly predictable sequence, and errors are common as children learn grammar rules. Children with language impairments often demonstrate continued difficulty with grammatical morphemes. This journal self-study explores issues related to grammar development, as well as factors to consider when assessing and treating grammar deficits. Clinicians can use this information to improve intervention and optimize grammar development in children with language disorders.
Credit(s): PDHs: 7.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.7
Summary: This journal self-study course highlights various instructional strategies that demonstrate positive progress for students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The findings and recommendations can assist SLPs in choosing strategies that produce targeted outcomes for students with ASD on their caseload.
Credit(s): PDHs: 9.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.95
Summary: This journal self study explores the nature of working memory and its relationship to language and learning. The articles – from a recently published Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools clinical forum – discuss working memory and how it relates to language development; executive functions and working memory as they relate to bilingualism, math, and decoding; and practical assessment and treatment strategies related to working memory and language. Clinicians can use this research to improve their assessment and intervention processes to help students with memory deficits succeed.
Credit(s): PDHs: 6.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.6
Summary: Children with speech sound disorders make up a large part of the caseload for many SLPs who work with preschool and school-age children. Speech sound disorders not only affect a child’s ability to communicate at a young age but also may lead to later speech and literacy difficulties. This journal self-study explores issues related to managing speech sound disorders, including assessment and treatment options. It also includes articles that identify predictors of future speech and literacy problems. Clinicians can use this information to help identify appropriate assessment tools and potential treatment options, as well as counsel parents and teachers of children who may be at risk for continuing speech and academic difficulties.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.55
Summary: Communication disorders in children may affect social interactions and lead to negative emotional and behavioral outcomes. This journal self-study explores well-being, resilience, and emotional competence in school-age children. The articles discuss ways to identify risk factors to emotional well-being (including victimization and bullying), assess emotional competence, and support emotional expression in children who use AAC. The final article explores counseling and the role the SLP plays in addressing emotional issues as a part of intervention.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.55
Summary: Literacy skills begin to develop in early childhood, and addressing deficits in reading and writing skills early may prevent later problems in school. This journal self-study explores special situations that may affect literacy skills, including the presence of speech sound disorders, hearing impairment, and cultural and/or socioeconomic differences. It also includes articles that discuss intervention techniques to improve phonological awareness, an important emergent literacy skill. Clinicians can use this information to improve reading and writing assessment and treatment techniques for preschool and early elementary school children.
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.55
Summary: The articles in this journal self-study discuss the literacy difficulties many children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) experience, with direct clinical implications for literacy assessment and intervention. The articles, which apply to children across the age spectrum, are from a 2021 forum published in Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, titled “Literacy in Autism—Across the Spectrum.”
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: This journal self-study updates clinicians on advances in the field that can refine current diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). Two articles address assessment: One examines how type of stimuli can affect differential diagnosis of CAS, and the other identifies possible red flags in young children by examining characteristics of speech production in infants and toddlers who were later diagnosed with CAS. Two additional articles address advances in intervention for CAS: One looks at the efficacy of adding prosody as a treatment component, and the other explores a model-based treatment protocol.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) often benefits children with severe disabilities. The most effective AAC systems consider the child’s individual needs and support learning and social interactions. This journal self-study explores ways to improve AAC systems to increase language skills, allow for more active participation in communication, and encourage emotional competence. Incorporating parent perceptions about AAC use into decision-making is also discussed, as are the benefits of peer involvement in communication using AAC. Clinicians will be able to incorporate strategies discussed to enhance services for children using AAC.
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