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Instructional Level
Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: This activity is a grouping of studies related to the understanding stuttering throughout the life span. The activity is based on articles related to attentional focus on motor control in people who stutter (PWS) and the relationship to social stress, acoustic measures of emotion in children who stutter, a study of covert stuttering throughout the lifespan, vocational stereotyping of PWS by human resource preprofessionals, and audio-based podcasts to assist in self-help for PWS. Together, these articles investigate important measures in understanding stuttering and how researchers and clinicians can better understand the condition of stuttering.
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.15
Summary: This Perspectives (SIG 3) article provides a thorough review of the literature regarding autoimmune disease and effects on voice and laryngeal function. To maximize patient outcomes, guidelines for differential diagnosis and referral patterns are highlighted.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.25
Summary: These articles show the breadth of topics relevant to the understanding and treatment of fluency and fluency disorders. The articles include topics on the impact of allergies on the sleep of children who stutter and using solution-focused principles to elicit perspectives on therapeutic change in older children who stutter and their parents.
Presenter(s): Sandra A. Schwartz, Dee Adams Nikjeh, and Katherine McConville
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.15
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 3) articles address ethical considerations for voice and upper airway clinicians, including billing questions and reimbursement issues as well as factors that guide ethical decision-making to determine what comprises medically necessary voice therapy that involves or targets singing voice.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: In these Perspectives (SIG 4) articles, two of the articles relate to patterns of disfluency in young bilingual children—one of these two articles adds the patterns of stuttering in young bilingual children that stutter. The third article uses a thematic analysis to help understand why adults who stutter attended self-help groups.