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Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: First, Julie Case and Maria Grigos provide a review of speech motor control literature in childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) and give clinical implications to the assessment and treatment of CAS. Second, Kristen Allison reviews approaches to measuring speech intelligibility in children with motor speech disorders. Third, Tricia McCabe, Donna Thomas, and Elizabeth Murray describe Rapid Syllable Transition Treatment (ReST) as a treatment for CAS. Fourth, Nancy Tarshis, Michelle Winner, and Pamela Crooke explore how communication challenges in CAS impact social competency and how speech motor challenges impact social development. Finally, Nina Benway and Jonathan Preston evaluate if features of CAS in the literature could be replicated in a sample of school-age children. Readers will describe how speech motor skills have been found to change with practice in CAS, list the linguistic factors that can influence intelligibility, describe the quality of the research that supports ReST, explain ways to consider social cognition in therapy for CAS, and rank the speech features that distinguish the narrow phonetic transcriptions of children with CAS and speech sound disorders.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.45
Summary: These SIG 2 Perspectives articles focus on counseling skills for working with persons with aphasia, “counseling+” activities for patients with mild cognitive impairment and dementia, and resilience in neurorehabilitation. Topics include counseling skills; counseling roles of SLPs; care partner training; and resilience in persons with acquired brain injury, aphasia, dementia, and Alzheimer’s disease.
Credit(s): PDHs: 7.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.7
Summary: First, Katie Strong and Barbara Shadden provide an overview of the relationship between narrative, identity, and social co-construction for persons with aphasia and narrative treatment approaches for identity renegotiation. Second, Jamie Azios and Jack Damico relate the Lifetime Participation Approach to Aphasia (LPAA) and issues in longterm care (LTC) along with practice recommendations for implementing LPAA in LTC. Third, Jerry Hoepner and Tom Sather examine the potential approaches for teaching and mentoring students in LPAA. Fourth, Rochelle Cohen-Schneider, Melodie Chan, Denise McCall, Allison Tedesco, and Ann Abramson explore balancing relationshipcentered care and professionalism. Finally, Sarah Wallace, Elena Donoso Brown, Anna Saylor, Erica Lapp, and Joanna Eskander describe aphasia-friendly modifications for occupational therapy assessments and home programs.
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.1
Summary: These SIG 2 articles focus on clinical assessment and practices for individuals with aphasia. Topics covered included challenges associated with diagnosing primary progressive aphasia (PPA) and the impact of adaptive yoga programs for persons with aphasia. First, Aimee Dietz, E. Susan Duncan, Lauren Bislick, Sarah Stegman, Jenna Collins, Chitrali Mamlekar, Rachel Gleason, and Michael J. McCarthy provide an overview of the potential impact adapted yoga programs can have for people with stroke-induced aphasia. Second, Adithya Chandregowda raises awareness about the challenges associated with encountering primary progressive aphasia (PPA) patients in the acute hospital setting.
Credit(s): PDHs: 2.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.2
Summary: This Perspectives activity contains three articles, all with emphasis on social considerations in the elderly, with emphases on risk factors for dementia and treatment of Parkinson’s Disease. The first article seeks to describe the validity and reliability of the Fun and Social Engagement Evaluation (FUSE). The authors explain that this is an important topic because lack of physical activity and low social engagement are risk factors for dementia and could impact the rate of decline associated with dementia. Furthermore, physical inactivity has been identified by the World Health Organization as a leading risk factor for global mortality. Nursing home residents were evaluated using the FUSE during “Bingocize” sessions; the program combines a bingo-like game and physical activity and is scaled for differing cognitive and physical levels of ability. Results indicate that the FUSE is a valid and reliable method to measure engagement, and this is important because this measure can be recommended to nursing homes to measure engagement, as well as used in future research. The second article attempts to determine which of a variety of factors were associated with communicative participation and measured this based on the social network size of an individual. The author feels that this is important because social isolation is linked to cognitive decline and depression, both of which are risk factors for developing dementia. This study builds on previous research related to social participation and communication as predictors of successful health outcomes. Two research questions are addressed: What numbers of communication partners exist in the self-reported social network of older adults? And what factors are included in a model for predicting the social network size of older adults? They studied 337 seniors in Central Arkansas by collecting interviews and conducting standardized assessments. Results indicate that cognition and education are factors that are related to communicative participation. The results of this study, along with additional literature on this topic, suggest that there is benefit in recognizing a decrease in communicative participation and the role that cognitive decline may play in restricting communicative participation. The final article describes the program developed at Long Island University Brooklyn, which is multidisciplinary in nature, in contrast to previous treatment models which have traditionally focused on a monodisciplinary approach. In the past decade, there has been a shift from monodisciplinary models and research to a multidisciplinary approach, which is more effective in holistically treating the multifaceted effects of Parkinson’s Disease (PD), resulting in better outcomes and social participation for individuals with PD. The article describes use of the Fitness for PD exercise program twice per week for ten weeks, targeting strength, balance, agility, stretching, and aerobic exercises. Students at the university are engaged in taking vitals, facilitating resistance training, and enhancing safety; students and participants find benefit in working together. One hour Speech Clinic for PD sessions are conducted after each fitness class, including voice evaluations and therapy focusing on maximizing voice production and improving breathing patterns. The first half of sessions are conducted in game format, which encourages interpersonal interactions and collaboration and facilitates carryover into conversational contexts. Sessions incorporate Motor Learning Principles, LSVT LOUD, and respiratory exercises. The second half of sessions are conducted in whole-group format and speech practice in small groups.
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.15
Summary: These articles explore thickened liquids for oropharyngeal dysphagia, importance of patient selection, & balancing physical welfare/quality of life (QOL); QOL in patients/caregivers in recovery for swallowing disorders; audiologist knowledge of cognitive impairment/screening in outcomes/communication; and hearing screening for individuals who are diagnosed with dementia.
Credit(s): PDHs: 1.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.15
Summary: This course examines three progressive cultural topics as they relate to speech-language pathology and audiology: ageism among CSD graduate students; institutional, symbolic, and individual systems of oppression; and the interaction between social determinants and health disparities.