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Credit(s): PDHs: 5.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.5
Summary: This activity is a grouping of studies related to the understanding stuttering throughout the life span. The activity is based on articles related to attentional focus on motor control in people who stutter (PWS) and the relationship to social stress, acoustic measures of emotion in children who stutter, a study of covert stuttering throughout the lifespan, vocational stereotyping of PWS by human resource preprofessionals, and audio-based podcasts to assist in self-help for PWS. Together, these articles investigate important measures in understanding stuttering and how researchers and clinicians can better understand the condition of stuttering.
Credit(s): PDHs: 7.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.7
Summary: First, Katie Strong and Barbara Shadden provide an overview of the relationship between narrative, identity, and social co-construction for persons with aphasia and narrative treatment approaches for identity renegotiation. Second, Jamie Azios and Jack Damico relate the Lifetime Participation Approach to Aphasia (LPAA) and issues in longterm care (LTC) along with practice recommendations for implementing LPAA in LTC. Third, Jerry Hoepner and Tom Sather examine the potential approaches for teaching and mentoring students in LPAA. Fourth, Rochelle Cohen-Schneider, Melodie Chan, Denise McCall, Allison Tedesco, and Ann Abramson explore balancing relationshipcentered care and professionalism. Finally, Sarah Wallace, Elena Donoso Brown, Anna Saylor, Erica Lapp, and Joanna Eskander describe aphasia-friendly modifications for occupational therapy assessments and home programs.
Credit(s): PDHs: 3.5, ASHA CEUs*: 0.35
Summary: In these Perspectives (SIG 4) articles, two of the articles relate to patterns of disfluency in young bilingual children—one of these two articles adds the patterns of stuttering in young bilingual children that stutter. The third article uses a thematic analysis to help understand why adults who stutter attended self-help groups.
Credit(s): PDHs: 4.0, ASHA CEUs*: 0.4
Summary: These Perspectives (SIG 4) covered a diverse area of topics as they related to fluency and fluency disorders, including word-final disfluencies, social support, behavioral and affective comparisons of people who stutter, school participation by children who stutter, and leadership and childhood responses to a public attitudes about stuttering survey.